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Mobile Money, Remittances and Rural Household Welfare: Panel Evidence from Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Ggombe Kasim Munyegera

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)

  • Tomoya Matsumoto

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)

Abstract

Mobile money service in Uganda has expanded rapidly, penetrating as much as over 30 percent of the adult population in just four years since its inception. We investigate the impact of this financial innovation on household welfare, using household survey panel data from rural Uganda. Results from our preferred specification reveal that adopting mobile money services increases household per capita consumption by 72 percent. The mechanism of this impact is the facilitation of remittances; user households are more likely to receive remittances, receive remittances more frequently and the total value received is significantly higher than that of non-user households. Our results are robust to a number of robustness checks. JEL (O16, O17, O33, I131)

Suggested Citation

  • Ggombe Kasim Munyegera & Tomoya Matsumoto, 2014. "Mobile Money, Remittances and Rural Household Welfare: Panel Evidence from Uganda," GRIPS Discussion Papers 14-22, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ngi:dpaper:14-22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Combes, Jean-Louis & Ebeke, Christian Hubert & Etoundi, Sabine Mireille Ntsama & Yogo, Thierry Urbain, 2014. "Are Remittances and Foreign Aid a Hedge Against Food Price Shocks in Developing Countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 81-98.
    2. Stefan Dercon & Daniel O. Gilligan & John Hoddinott & Tassew Woldehanna, 2009. "The Impact of Agricultural Extension and Roads on Poverty and Consumption Growth in Fifteen Ethiopian Villages," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(4), pages 1007-1021.
    3. Chetty, Raj & Looney, Adam, 2006. "Consumption smoothing and the welfare consequences of social insurance in developing economies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(12), pages 2351-2356, December.
    4. William Jack & Adam Ray & Tavneet Suri, 2013. "Transaction Networks: Evidence from Mobile Money in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 356-361, May.
    5. Pousttchi, Key & Schurig, Martin, 2004. "Assessment of Today’s Mobile Banking Applications from the View of Customer Requirements," MPRA Paper 2913, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Jenny C. Aker, 2010. "Information from Markets Near and Far: Mobile Phones and Agricultural Markets in Niger," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 46-59, July.
    7. Stijn Claessens, 2006. "Access to Financial Services: A Review of the Issues and Public Policy Objectives," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 207-240.
    8. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    9. Buys, Piet & Dasgupta, Susmita & Thomas, Timothy S. & Wheeler, David, 2009. "Determinants of a Digital Divide in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Spatial Econometric Analysis of Cell Phone Coverage," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1494-1505, September.
    10. Muto, Megumi & Yamano, Takashi, 2009. "The Impact of Mobile Phone Coverage Expansion on Market Participation: Panel Data Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1887-1896, December.
    11. Angus Deaton & Salman Zaidi, 2002. "Guidelines for Constructing Consumption Aggregates for Welfare Analysis," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14101, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lwanga, Musa & Adong, Annet, 2016. "A pathway to financial inclusion: mobile money and individual Savings in Uganda," Research Series 234553, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
    2. Dube, Thulani & Chummun, Bibi Zaheenah, 2019. "Mobile Money access and usage among the rural communities in Zimbabwe," MPRA Paper 97578, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Dec 2019.
    3. Murendo, Conrad & Wollni, Meike, 2016. "Mobile money and household food security in Uganda," GlobalFood Discussion Papers 229805, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    4. Ggombe Kasim Munyegera & Tomoya Matsumoto, 2015. "ICT for Financial Inclusion: Mobile Money and the Financial Behavior of Rural Households in Uganda," GRIPS Discussion Papers 15-20, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    5. Mahamadou Roufahi Tankari, 2018. "Mobile Phone and Households¡¯ Poverty: Evidence from Niger," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 43(2), pages 67-84, June.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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