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Transaction Networks: Evidence from Mobile Money in Kenya

Author

Listed:
  • William Jack
  • Adam Ray
  • Tavneet Suri

Abstract

Mobile money allows households in Kenya to spread risk more efficiently. In this paper we show that these efficiencies are achieved through deeper financial integration and expanded informal networks. Active networks are more geographically dispersed and support more reciprocal financial arrangements. Consistent with the reported reciprocity, mobile money users report a higher share of transactions as being for credit and insurance purposes.

Suggested Citation

  • William Jack & Adam Ray & Tavneet Suri, 2013. "Transaction Networks: Evidence from Mobile Money in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 356-361, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:103:y:2013:i:3:p:356-61
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.103.3.356
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.103.3.356
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/aer/ds/may2013/P2013_4367_ds.zip
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Isaac Mbiti & David N. Weil, 2015. "Mobile Banking: The Impact of M-Pesa in Kenya," NBER Chapters,in: African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development, pages 247-293 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marco Manacorda & Andrea Tesei, 2016. "Liberation Technology: Mobile Phones and Political Mobilization in Africa," HiCN Working Papers 217, Households in Conflict Network.
    2. Murendo, Conrad & Wollni, Meike & de Brauw, Alan & Mugabi, Nicholas, 2015. "Social network effects on mobile money adoption in Uganda," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212514, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Ggombe Kasim Munyegera & Tomoya Matsumoto, 2014. "Mobile Money, Remittances and Rural Household Welfare: Panel Evidence from Uganda," GRIPS Discussion Papers 14-22, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    4. Murendo, Conrad & Wollni, Meike, 2016. "Mobile money and household food security in Uganda," Discussion Papers 229805, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    5. repec:spr:fininn:v:2:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1186_s40854-016-0033-x is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Sekabira, Haruna & Qaim, Matin, 2016. "Mobile Money, Agricultural Marketing, and Off-Farm Income in Uganda," Discussion Papers 234998, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    7. Ggombe Kasim Munyegera & Tomoya Matsumoto, 2015. "ICT for Financial Inclusion: Mobile Money and the Financial Behavior of Rural Households in Uganda," GRIPS Discussion Papers 15-20, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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