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The FinTech Opportunity

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  • Thomas Philippon

Abstract

This paper assesses the potential impact of FinTech on the finance industry, focusing on financial stability and access to services. I document first that financial services remain surprisingly expensive, which explains the emergence of new entrants. I then argue that the current regulatory approach is subject to significant political economy and coordination costs, and therefore unlikely to deliver much structural change. FinTech, on the other hand, can bring deep changes but is likely to create significant regulatory challenges.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Philippon, 2016. "The FinTech Opportunity," NBER Working Papers 22476, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:22476
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Opportunities in Finance
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2016-08-29 17:30:40
    2. How risky are the big U.S. banks?
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2016-10-03 17:58:45

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    Cited by:

    1. Bömer, Max & Maxin, Hannes, 2018. "Why Fintechs Cooperate with Banks - Evidence from Germany," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-637, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    2. de Roure, Calebe & Pelizzon, Loriana & Thakor, Anjan V., 2018. "P2P lenders versus banks: Cream skimming or bottom fishing?," SAFE Working Paper Series 206, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • L1 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance
    • L4 - Industrial Organization - - Antitrust Issues and Policies
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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