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Private Politics and Public Regulation

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  • Georgy Egorov
  • Bård Harstad

Abstract

We develop a dynamic game to explore the interaction between regulation and private policies, such as self-regulation by firms and activism. Without a public regulator, the possibility of self-regulation is bad for the firm, but good for activists who are willing to maintain a costly boycott to raise the likelihood of self-regulation. Results are reversed when the regulator is present: the firm then self-regulates to preempt public regulation, while activists start and continue boycotts to raise the likelihood of such regulation. Our analytical results describe when a boycott is likely, and when it may be expected to be short and/or successful. The model generates a rich set of testable comparative statics.

Suggested Citation

  • Georgy Egorov & Bård Harstad, 2013. "Private Politics and Public Regulation," NBER Working Papers 19737, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19737
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hirose, Kosuke & Matsumura, Toshihiro, 2017. "Emission Cap Commitment versus Emission Intensity Commitment as Self-Regulation," MPRA Paper 82564, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation

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