IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Economics and Politics of Corporate Social Performance


  • Baron, David P.

    (Stanford University)

  • Harjoto, Maretno A.

    (Pepperdine University)

  • Jo, Hoje

    (Santa Clara University)


This paper estimates a three-equation structural model based on a theory that relates corporate financial performance (CFP), corporate social performance (CSP), and social pressure. CFP is found to be independent of CSP and decreasing in social pressure, and CSP is independent of CFP and increasing in social pressure. Social pressure is increasing in CSP and decreasing in CFP, which is consistent with social pressure being directed to soft targets. These relations were stronger during the first four years of the Bush administration than the last four year of the Clinton administration. Disaggregating the measure of social pressure indicate that the relations among CFP, CSP, and social pressure are due to private politics and not public politics. For consumer industries greater CSP is associated with better CFP, and the opposite is true for industrial industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Baron, David P. & Harjoto, Maretno A. & Jo, Hoje, 2009. "The Economics and Politics of Corporate Social Performance," Research Papers 1993r, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:stabus:1993r

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Navarro, Peter, 1988. "Why Do Corporations Give to Charity?," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(1), pages 65-93, January.
    2. Maxwell, John W & Lyon, Thomas P & Hackett, Steven C, 2000. "Self-Regulation and Social Welfare: The Political Economy of Corporate Environmentalism," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(2), pages 583-617, October.
    3. Heinkel, Robert & Kraus, Alan & Zechner, Josef, 2001. "The Effect of Green Investment on Corporate Behavior," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(04), pages 431-449, December.
    4. Graff Zivin Joshua & Small Arthur, 2005. "A Modigliani-Miller Theory of Altruistic Corporate Social Responsibility," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-21, May.
    5. Milyo Jeffrey & Primo David & Groseclose Timothy, 2000. "Corporate PAC Campaign Contributions in Perspective," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-15, April.
    6. Kotchen Matthew & Moon Jon J., 2012. "Corporate Social Responsibility for Irresponsibility," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-23, November.
    7. Cespa, Giovanni & Cestone, Giacinta, 2004. "Corporate Social Responsibility and Managerial Entrenchment," CEPR Discussion Papers 4648, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Aaron K. Chatterji & David I. Levine & Michael W. Toffel, 2009. "How Well Do Social Ratings Actually Measure Corporate Social Responsibility?," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 125-169, March.
    9. Leonardo Becchetti & Rocco Ciciretti & Iftekhar Hasan, 2007. "Corporate social responsibility and shareholder's value: an event study analysis," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    10. Hong, Harrison & Kacperczyk, Marcin, 2009. "The price of sin: The effects of social norms on markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 15-36, July.
    11. Binder, Seth & Neumayer, Eric, 2005. "Environmental pressure group strength and air pollution: An empirical analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 527-538, December.
    12. Donald S. Siegel & Donald F. Vitaliano, 2007. "An Empirical Analysis of the Strategic Use of Corporate Social Responsibility," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(3), pages 773-792, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Boodoo, Muhammad Umar, 2016. "Does mandatory CSR reporting regulation lead to improved Corporate Social Performance? Evidence from India," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67559, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Heinen, Sarah & Hartmann, Monika, 2013. "Corporate Social Responsibility in the German Pork Industry: Relevance and Determinants," 2013 International European Forum, February 18-22, 2013, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 164733, International European Forum on Innovation and System Dynamics in Food Networks.
    3. Vicente Lima Crisóstomo & Fátima de Souza Freire & Felipe Cortes de Vasconcellos, 2011. "Corporate social responsibility, firm value and financial performance in Brazil," Social Responsibility Journal, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 7(2), pages 295-309, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L21 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Business Objectives of the Firm
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ecl:stabus:1993r. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.