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Does Practice-Based Teacher Preparation Increase Student Achievement? Early Evidence from the Boston Teacher Residency

Author

Listed:
  • John P. Papay
  • Martin R. West
  • Jon B. Fullerton
  • Thomas J. Kane

Abstract

The Boston Teacher Residency is an innovative practice-based preparation program in which candidates work alongside a mentor teacher for a year before becoming a teacher of record in Boston Public Schools. We find that BTR graduates are more racially diverse than other BPS novices, more likely to teach math and science, and more likely to remain teaching in the district through year five. Initially, BTR graduates for whom value-added performance data are available are no more effective at raising student test scores than other novice teachers in English language arts and less effective in math. The effectiveness of BTR graduates in math improves rapidly over time, however, such that by their fourth and fifth years they out-perform veteran teachers. Simulations of the program's overall impact through retention and effectiveness suggest that it is likely to improve student achievement in the district only modestly over the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • John P. Papay & Martin R. West & Jon B. Fullerton & Thomas J. Kane, 2011. "Does Practice-Based Teacher Preparation Increase Student Achievement? Early Evidence from the Boston Teacher Residency," NBER Working Papers 17646, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17646
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jesse Rothstein, 2010. "Teacher Quality in Educational Production: Tracking, Decay, and Student Achievement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(1), pages 175-214.
    2. Thomas J. Kane & Douglas O. Staiger, 2008. "Estimating Teacher Impacts on Student Achievement: An Experimental Evaluation," NBER Working Papers 14607, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Donald Boyd & Pamela Grossman & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2008. "Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement," Working Papers id:1659, eSocialSciences.
    4. Matthew Ronfeldt & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2011. "How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 17176, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin & Daniel M. O'Brien, 2005. "The Market for Teacher Quality," Discussion Papers 04-025, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    6. Donald Boyd & Pamela Grossman & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2006. "How Changes in Entry Requirements Alter the Teacher Workforce and Affect Student Achievement," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 1(2), pages 176-216, April.
    7. Zeyu Xu & Jane Hannaway & Colin Taylor, 2011. "Making a difference? The effects of Teach For America in high school," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(3), pages 447-469, June.
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    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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