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Matched panel data estimates of the impact of Teach First on school and departmental performance


  • Rebecca Allen

    () (Institute of Education, University of London)

  • Jay Allnutt

    () (Teach First, London)


In this paper we evaluate whether the placement of Teach First’s carefully selected, yet inexperienced new teachers into deprived secondary schools in England has altered the educational outcomes of pupils at the age of 16. Our difference-in-difference panel estimation approach matches schools participating early on in the scheme to those within the same region. We find the programme has not been damaging to schools who joined and most likely produced school-wide gains in GCSE results in the order of 5% of a pupil standard deviation or around one grade in one of the pupil’s best eight subjects. We estimate pupil point-in-time fixed effect models to identify core subject departmental gains of over 5% of a subject grade resulting from placing a Teach First participant in a teaching team of six teachers.

Suggested Citation

  • Rebecca Allen & Jay Allnutt, 2013. "Matched panel data estimates of the impact of Teach First on school and departmental performance," DoQSS Working Papers 13-11, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1311

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Donald Boyd & Pamela Grossman & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2006. "How Changes in Entry Requirements Alter the Teacher Workforce and Affect Student Achievement," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 1(2), pages 176-216, April.
    8. C. Kirabo Jackson & Elias Bruegmann, 2009. "Teaching Students and Teaching Each Other: The Importance of Peer Learning for Teachers," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(4), pages 85-108, October.
    9. Rebecca Allen & Simon Burgess & Jennifer Mayo, 2018. "The teacher labour market, teacher turnover and disadvantaged schools: new evidence for England," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 4-23, January.
    10. Clotfelter, Charles T. & Ladd, Helen F. & Vigdor, Jacob L., 2007. "Teacher credentials and student achievement: Longitudinal analysis with student fixed effects," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 673-682, December.
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    13. repec:mpr:mprres:4150 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:mpr:mprres:4012 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Gabrielle Wills, 2016. "Principal leadership changes in South Africa: Investigating their consequences for school performance," Working Papers 01/2016, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    2. Wills, Gabrielle, 2016. "Principal leadership changes and their consequences for school performance in South Africa," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 108-124.

    More about this item


    teacher preparation; school performance; teacher effectiveness;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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