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Bi-Directions Impacts of Economic, Social and Environmental Changes and the New Zealand Housing Market

  • Arthur Grimes

    ()

    (Motu Economic Research and Public Policy)

  • Suzi Kerr

    ()

    (Motu Economic Research and Public Policy)

  • Andrew Aitken

    ()

    (Motu Economic Research and Public Policy)

This report was prepared for the Centre for Housing Research Aotearoa New Zealand (CHRANZ). The aim of this study is to identify a set of housing research projects addressing two related topics. First, the impact of economic, social and environmental changes on housing in New Zealand's non-metropolitan regions; and second, the economic, social and environmental impacts of the New Zealand housing market. Identification of these projects is designed to help CHRANZ in developing and prioritising its research agenda pertaining to policy-relevant housing research within New Zealand. By doing so, we aim to outline coherent programmes of research that develop a comprehensive body of knowledge about the housing sector and its interactions with other key elements of society. The study suggests a set of research questions leading to coherent programmes of research, rather than to answer the research questions. We concentrate on posing questions that are of policy concern. Some are matters of current official policy concern. Others relate to issues that non-official sources consider should be of policy concern or which we judge may become of official concern in future years. Thus our analysis is informed by current policy priorities, but seeks to take a strategic look also at forthcoming priorities that may emerge over the next five years.

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File URL: http://motu-www.motu.org.nz/wpapers/04_09.pdf
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Paper provided by Motu Economic and Public Policy Research in its series Working Papers with number 04_09.

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Length: 116 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:04_09
Contact details of provider: Postal: Level 1, 97 Cuba Street, P.O. Box 24390, Wellington
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Fax: 64-4-939-4251
Web page: http://www.motu.org.nz
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  1. David C. Maré & Jason Timmins, 2003. "Moving to Jobs?," Working Papers 03_07, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  2. Arthur Grimes & Andrew Aitken, 2005. "What’s the Beef with House Prices? Economic Shocks and Local Housing Markets," Urban/Regional 0509011, EconWPA.
  3. Edward L. Glaeser & Albert Saiz, 2003. "The rise of the skilled city," Working Papers 04-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  4. Karl E. Case & Robert J. Shiller, 2003. "Is There a Bubble in the Housing Market?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 34(2), pages 299-362.
  5. Gregory, R.G. & Hunter, B., 1995. "The Macro Economy and the Growth of Ghettos and Urban Poverty in Australia," CEPR Discussion Papers 325, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
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  8. Richard K. Green & Michelle J. White, 1994. "Measuring the Benefits of Homeowning: Effects on Children," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 93, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  9. Denise DiPasquale & Edward L. Glaeser, 1998. "Incentives and Social Capital: Are Homeowners Better Citizens?," NBER Working Papers 6363, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Robert J. Shiller & Allan N. Weiss, 1994. "Home Equity Insurance," NBER Working Papers 4830, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Edward L. Glaeser & David I. Laibson & José A. Scheinkman & Christine L. Soutter, 2000. "Measuring Trust," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(3), pages 811-846, August.
    • Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Laibson, David I. & Scheinkman, Jose A. & Soutter, Christine L., 2000. "Measuring Trust," Scholarly Articles 4481497, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  12. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2002. "An Economic Approach to Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 437-458, November.
  13. Steven N. Durlauf, 2002. "On the Empirics of Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 459-479, November.
  14. Donald R. Haurin & Toby L. Parcel & R. Jean Haurin, 2002. "Does Homeownership Affect Child Outcomes?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 635-666.
  15. Robert J. Shiller & Allan N. Weiss, 1998. "Moral Hazard in Home Equity Conversion," NBER Working Papers 6552, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser, 1995. "Are Ghettos Good or Bad?," NBER Working Papers 5163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Arthur Grimes & Andrew Aitken & Suzi Kerr, 2004. "House Price Efficiency: Expectations, Sales, Symmetry," Urban/Regional 0408001, EconWPA.
  18. Edward L. Glaeser & Joseph Gyourko, 2002. "The Impact of Zoning on Housing Affordability," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1948, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  19. Paul Flatau & Matt Forbes & Patric H. Hendershott, 2003. "Homeownership and Unemployment: The Roles of Leverage and Public Housing," NBER Working Papers 10021, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  20. Karla Hoff & Arijit Sen, 2005. "Homeownership, Community Interactions, and Segregation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1167-1189, September.
  21. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote, 1999. "Why Is There More Crime in Cities?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages S225-S258, December.
  22. William Brock & Steven N. Durlauf, 2000. "Interactions-Based Models," NBER Technical Working Papers 0258, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  23. Capozza, Dennis R. & Seguin, Paul J., 1996. "Expectations, efficiency, and euphoria in the housing market," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3-4), pages 369-386, June.
  24. Suzi Kerr & Andrew Aitken & Arthur Grimes, 2004. "Land Taxes and Revenue Needs as Communities Grow and Decline: Evidence from New Zealand," Working Papers 04_01, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  25. Edward L. Glaeser & Joseph Gyourko, 2003. "The impact of building restrictions on housing affordability," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jun, pages 21-39.
  26. Arthur Grimes & Suzi Kerr & Andrew Aitken, 2003. "Housing and Economic Adjustment," Working Papers 03_09, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  27. Karl E. Case & Robert J. Shiller, 1988. "The Behavior of Home Buyers in Boom and Post-Boom Markets," NBER Working Papers 2748, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  28. Papps, Kerry L. & Newell, James O., 2002. "Identifying Functional Labour Market Areas in New Zealand: A Reconnaissance Study Using Travel-to-Work Data," IZA Discussion Papers 443, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  29. Case, Karl E & Shiller, Robert J, 1989. "The Efficiency of the Market for Single-Family Homes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 125-37, March.
  30. DiPasquale, Denise, 1999. "Why Don't We Know More about Housing Supply?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 9-23, January.
  31. O'Flaherty, B., 1995. "An Economic Theory of Homelessness and Housing," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 13-49, March.
  32. Sweeney, James L., 1974. "A commodity hierarchy model of the rental housing market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 288-323, July.
  33. Fabling, Richard & Grimes, Arthur, 2005. "Insolvency and economic development: Regional variation and adjustment," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 57(4), pages 339-359.
  34. Productivity Commission, 2004. "First Home Ownership," Others 0410007, EconWPA.
  35. Joseph Gyourko & Albert Saiz, 2003. "Urban decline and housing reinvestment: the role of construction costs and the supply side," Working Papers 03-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
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