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Gender Gaps in Time Use and Earnings: What's Norms Got to Do With It?

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  • Nan L. Maxwell
  • Nathan Wozny

Abstract

This research assesses the extent to which norms related to behaviors at home and work and to parenting might affect gender differences in time allocation, earnings, and employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Nan L. Maxwell & Nathan Wozny, "undated". "Gender Gaps in Time Use and Earnings: What's Norms Got to Do With It?," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 38f127bf7f494794807db7a3a, Mathematica Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:38f127bf7f494794807db7a3ac395da3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    norms; earnings; employment; time use; gender differentials;

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