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Whose money, whose time? A nonparametric approach to modeling time spent on housework in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Sanjiv Gupta
  • Michael Ash

Abstract

This paper argues that earlier quantitative research on the relationship between heterosexual partners' earnings and time spent on housework has two basic flaws: First, it has focused on the effects of women's shares of couples' total earnings on housework, not considering the simpler possibility of an association between women's absolute earnings and housework. Second, it tends to draw uniform inferences across the range of data, including regions where the data are sparse. This paper adopts a flexible, nonparametric approach to examine this relationship within a US context, while not imposing the polynomial specifications on data that characterize the two dominant models. The results provide support for an alternative model that emphasizes the importance of partners' own earnings for their housework, especially in the case of women. Women's earnings are negatively associated with their housework hours, independent of their partners' earnings and their shares of couples' total earnings.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanjiv Gupta & Michael Ash, 2008. "Whose money, whose time? A nonparametric approach to modeling time spent on housework in the United States," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 93-120.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:14:y:2008:i:1:p:93-120
    DOI: 10.1080/13545700701716664
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marcantonio Caltabiano & Maria Gabriella Campolo & Antonino Di Pino, 2016. "Retirement and Intra-Household Labour Division of Italian Couples: A New Simultaneous Equation Approach," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(3), pages 1217-1238, September.
    2. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0667-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Marianne Bertrand & Emir Kamenica & Jessica Pan, 2015. "Gender Identity and Relative Income within Households," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 130(2), pages 571-614.
    4. Simon Bittmann, 2015. "Ressources économiques des femmes et travail domestique des conjoints : quels effets pour quelles tâches?," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 478(1), pages 305-338.
    5. Gigi Foster & Leslie S. Stratton, 2018. "Do significant labor market events change who does the chores? Paid work, housework, and power in mixed-gender Australian households," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(2), pages 483-519, April.
    6. repec:sbe:breart:v:32:y:2012:i:1:a:7451 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Simon Bittmann, 2015. "Ressources économiques des femmes et travail domestique des conjoints : quels effets pour quelles tâches ?," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5j2m1g6i7j8, Sciences Po.
    8. Brian D. Taylor & Kelcie Ralph & Michael Smart, 2015. "What Explains the Gender Gap in Schlepping? Testing Various Explanations for Gender Differences in Household-Serving Travel," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1493-1510, November.
    9. Vivien Procher & Nolan Ritter & Colin Vance, 2014. "Making dough or baking dough? Spousal housework responsibilities in Germany, 1992-2011," Schumpeter Discussion Papers SDP14004, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
    10. Marina Della Giusta & Nigar Hashimzade, 2012. "Who Cares? Modelling the Care Drain," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2012-04, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    11. Pedro Quintín Quílez, 2008. "Vida conyugal y desigualdades de género en Cali (Colombia)," REVISTA SOCIEDAD Y ECONOMIA - CIDSE, UNIVERSIDAD DEL VALLE - CIDSE, August.
    12. repec:zbw:rwirep:0472 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:rdg:wpaper:em-dp2012-04 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Vivien Procher & Nolan Ritter & Colin Vance, 2014. "Making Dough or Baking Dough? Spousal Housework Responsibilities in Germany, 1992-2011," Ruhr Economic Papers 0472, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    15. Gigi Foster & Leslie Stratton, 2017. "Do Significant Labour Market Events Change Who Does the Laundry? Work, chore allocation, and power in Australian households," Discussion Papers 2017-06, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    16. Lyn Craig & Janeen Baxter, 2016. "Domestic Outsourcing, Housework Shares and Subjective Time Pressure: Gender Differences in the Correlates of Hiring Help," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 271-288, January.
    17. Lyn Craig & Janeen Baxter, 2016. "Domestic Outsourcing, Housework Shares and Subjective Time Pressure: Gender Differences in the Correlates of Hiring Help," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 271-288, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Nonparametric regression; household economics; housework; JEL Codes: J1; J16; J22;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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