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Fiscal Multipliers in Malta

Author

Listed:
  • Ian Borg

    (Central Bank of Malta)

Abstract

This paper employs a Structural Vector Autoregression approach à la Blanchard and Perotti (2002) to investigate the impact of discretionary fiscal policy shocks on key macroeconomic variables in Malta. In order to gauge the quantitative impact of fiscal policy over the period 1995 to 2012, impact and cumulative multipliers are calculated. The response of GDP to government expenditure shocks and its components is low on impact but larger than one cumulatively. Moreover, private consumption responds positively to shocks in government spending, while private investment declines after a positive innovation to government expenditure.

Suggested Citation

  • Ian Borg, "undated". "Fiscal Multipliers in Malta," CBM Working Papers WP/06/2014, Central Bank of Malta.
  • Handle: RePEc:mlt:wpaper:0614
    as

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    File URL: https://www.centralbankmalta.org/file.aspx?f=1095
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General

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