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The Impact of UN and US Economic Sanctions on GDP Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Florian Neumeier

    () (University of Marburg)

  • Matthias Neuenkirch

    () (University of Trier)

Abstract

In this paper, we empirically assess how economic sanctions imposed by the UN and the US affect the target states' GDP growth. Our sample includes 68 countries and covers the period 1976-2012. We find that sanctions imposed by the UN have a statistically and economically significant influence on economic growth, but that the effect of US sanctions is less clear. On average, the imposition of UN sanctions decreases the target state's real per capita GDP growth rate by 2.3-3.5 percentage points (pp). Comprehensive UN economic sanctions, that is, embargoes affecting nearly all economic activity, trigger a reduction in GDP growth by more than 5 pp.

Suggested Citation

  • Florian Neumeier & Matthias Neuenkirch, 2014. "The Impact of UN and US Economic Sanctions on GDP Growth," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201424, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
  • Handle: RePEc:mar:magkse:201424
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Haqiqi , Iman & Bahalou Horeh , Marziyeh, 2013. "Macroeconomic Impacts of Export Barriers in a Dynamic CGE Model," Journal of Money and Economy, Monetary and Banking Research Institute, Central Bank of the Islamic Republic of Iran, vol. 8(3), pages 117-150, July.
    2. Jong‐Wha Lee & Ju Hyun Pyun, 2018. "North Korea’s Economic Integration and Growth Potential," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 301-325, September.
    3. Wang, Yiwei & Wang, Ke & Chang, Chun-Ping, 2019. "The impacts of economic sanctions on exchange rate volatility," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 58-65.
    4. Jerg Gutmann & Matthias Neuenkirch & Florian Neumeier, 2016. "Precision-Guided or Blunt? The Effects of US Economic Sanctions on Human Rights," ifo Working Paper Series 229, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    5. Matthias Neuenkirch & Florian Neumeier, 2015. "Always Affecting the Wrong People? The Impact of US Sanctions on Poverty," Research Papers in Economics 2015-03, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
    6. Ankudinov, Andrei & Ibragimov, Rustam & Lebedev, Oleg, 2017. "Sanctions and the Russian stock market," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 150-162.
    7. Afesorgbor, Sylvanus Kwaku & Mahadevan, Renuka, 2016. "The Impact of Economic Sanctions on Income Inequality of Target States," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 1-11.
    8. Liudmila Popova & Ehsan Rasoulinezhad, 2016. "Have Sanctions Modified Iran’s Trade Policy? An Evidence of Asianization and De-Europeanization through the Gravity Model," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-15, October.
    9. Chen, Yin E. & Fu, Qiang & Zhao, Xinxin & Yuan, Xuemei & Chang, Chun-Ping, 2019. "International sanctions’ impact on energy efficiency in target states," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 21-34.
    10. Morad Bali, 2018. "The Impact of Economic Sanctions on Russia and its Six Greatest European Trade Partners," Post-Print halshs-01918521, HAL.
    11. Barseghyan, Gayane, 2019. "Sanctions and counter-sanctions : What did they do?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 24/2019, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    12. Afesorgbor, Sylvanus Kwaku, 2019. "The impact of economic sanctions on international trade: How do threatened sanctions compare with imposed sanctions?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 11-26.
    13. Onialisoa Mirana Rakotoarivelo & Hanitriniaina Sammy Gr´egoire Ravelonirina, 2019. "On the Dynamic of Country Development," Journal of Mathematics Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 11(2), pages 1-19, April.
    14. Konstantin A. Kholodilin & Aleksei Netsunajev, 2016. "Crimea and Punishment: The Impact of Sanctions on Russian and European Economies," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1569, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    15. Gullstrand, Joakim, 2018. "What Goes Around Comes Around: The Effects of Sanctions on Swedish Firms in the Wake of the Ukraine Crisis," Working Papers 2018:28, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    16. M. Reza Gharibnavaz & Robert Waschik, 2015. "A Computable General Equilibrium Model of International Sanctions," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-255, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    17. Kholodilin, Konstantin A. & Netšunajev, Aleksei, 2019. "Crimea and punishment: the impact of sanctions on Russian economy and economies of the euro area," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 39-51.
    18. Mirkina, Irina, 2018. "FDI and sanctions: An empirical analysis of short- and long-run effects," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 198-225.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; economic sanctions; United Nations; United States.;

    JEL classification:

    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • F52 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - National Security; Economic Nationalism
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations

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