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Management and Motivation in Ugandan Primary Schools: An impact evaluation report

  • Abigail Barr
  • Lawrence Bategeka
  • Madina Guloba
  • Ibrahim Kasirye
  • Frederick Mugisha
  • Pieter Serneels
  • Andrew Zeitlin

Among the various challenges that the Ugandan government is facing to improve educational outcomes and achieve Universal Primary Education (UPE) in the country, is the necessity to improve the “quality of education”. Service delivery in education in Uganda has been proven to suffer, in great part, from the “weakness of accountability mechanisms between school administrators, teachers and the communities”. In order to assist national decision-makers in solving these issues, a team of local researchers set out to test and assess the effectiveness of two types of community-based monitoring interventions in improving general educational outcomes, using methods of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on a sample of 100 rural public primary schools in the country. This paper presents the main findings from this experimental impact evaluation project.

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Paper provided by PEP-PIERI in its series Working Papers PIERI with number 2012-14.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:lvl:piercr:2012-14
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  1. Nazmul Chaudhury & Jeffrey Hammer & Michael Kremer & Karthik Muralidharan & F. Halsey Rogers, 2006. "Missing in Action: Teacher and Health Worker Absence in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 91-116, Winter.
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  6. Martina Björkman & Jakob Svensson, 2009. "Power to the People: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment on Community-Based Monitoring in Uganda," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 124(2), pages 735-769, May.
  7. Aibgail Barr & Andrew Zeitlin, 2010. "Dictator games in the lab and in nature: External validity tested and investigated in Ugandan primary schools," Economics Series Working Papers CSAE WPS/2010-11, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  8. Karthik Muralidharan & Venkatesh Sundararaman, 2010. "The Impact of Diagnostic Feedback to Teachers on Student Learning: Experimental Evidence from India," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(546), pages F187-F203, 08.
  9. Juan Camilo Cárdenas P. & Christian R. Jaramillo H., 2007. "Cooperation In Large Networks: An Experimental," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 002202, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  10. Esther Duflo & Rema Hanna, 2006. "Monitoring works: Getting teachers to come to school," Framed Field Experiments 00142, The Field Experiments Website.
  11. Andreoni, James, 1988. "Why free ride? : Strategies and learning in public goods experiments," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 291-304, December.
  12. Banerjee, Abhijit & Banerji, Rukmini & Duflo, Esther & Glennerster, Rachel & Khemani, Stuti, 2008. "Pitfalls of Participatory Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Education in India," CEPR Discussion Papers 6781, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. David S. Lee, 2002. "Trimming for Bounds on Treatment Effects with Missing Outcomes," NBER Technical Working Papers 0277, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Harold Alderman & Daniel O. Gilligan & Kim Lehrer, 2012. "The Impact of Food for Education Programs on School Participation in Northern Uganda," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(1), pages 187 - 218.
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