IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Smoking Bans in the Presence of Social Interaction


  • Bauer, Christian
  • Lingens, Jörg


This paper analyzes the welfare effects of a public smoking ban in bars. We construct a model that captures crucial features of bar life: competing bars, social interaction, and heterogenous preferences for a smoking ban. Smokers and non-smokers simultaneously choose a bar given their preferences for meeting other people. Bars anticipate the behavior of individuals and choose the smoking regime strategically. Since the (dis)utility from smoking and social interaction are substitutes, the smoking regime is a stronger coordination device if the disutility from smoking is large. If all bars allow smoking in equilibrium, a public smoking ban enhances welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Bauer, Christian & Lingens, Jörg, 2009. "Smoking Bans in the Presence of Social Interaction," Discussion Papers in Economics 10593, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenec:10593

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Boyes, William J & Marlow, Michael L, 1996. "The Public Demand for Smoking Bans," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 88(1-2), pages 57-67, July.
    2. Dixit, Avinash & Olson, Mancur, 2000. "Does voluntary participation undermine the Coase Theorem?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 309-335, June.
    3. Bikhchandani, Sushil & Hirshleifer, David & Welch, Ivo, 1992. "A Theory of Fads, Fashion, Custom, and Cultural Change in Informational Cascades," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(5), pages 992-1026, October.
    4. John Dunham & Michael L. Marlow, 2004. "The Private Market for Accommodation: Determinants of Smoking Policies in Restaurants and Bars," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 377-391, Summer.
    5. Abhijit V. Banerjee, 1992. "A Simple Model of Herd Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 797-817.
    6. J. Dunham & ML. Marlow, 2000. "Smoking laws and their differential effects on restaurants, bars, and taverns," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(3), pages 326-333, July.
    7. John Dunham & Michael Marlow, 2003. "The economic incidence of smoking laws," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(18), pages 1935-1942.
    8. Christian Bauer & Jörg Lingens, 2008. "The Strategic Effects of Smoking Bans," Working Papers 055, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Smoking Ban; Social Interaction; Coordination Game;

    JEL classification:

    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lmu:muenec:10593. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Tamilla Benkelberg). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.