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Information aggregation with costly information and random ordering : experimental evidence

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  • Kraemer, Carlo
  • Nöth, Markus
  • Weber, Martin

Abstract

The cost of information is an often ignored factor in economic situations although the information acquisition behavior of the decision makers has a crucial influence on the outcome. In this experiment, we study an information aggregation process in which participants decide in a random sequence. Participants observe predecessors decisions and can acquire additional private information at a fixed price. We analyze participants information acquisition behavior and updating procedures. About one half of the individuals act rationally, whereas the other participants systematically overestimate the private signal value. This leads to excessive signal acquisitions and reduced conformity.

Suggested Citation

  • Kraemer, Carlo & Nöth, Markus & Weber, Martin, 2000. "Information aggregation with costly information and random ordering : experimental evidence," Papers 00-35, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
  • Handle: RePEc:mnh:spaper:2824
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    File URL: https://madoc.bib.uni-mannheim.de/2824/1/dp00_35.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mathias Drehmann & Jörg Oechssler & Andreas Roider, 2005. "Herding and Contrarian Behavior in Financial Markets: An Internet Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1403-1426, December.
    2. Gilles Hilary & Lior Menzly, 2006. "Does Past Success Lead Analysts to Become Overconfident?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(4), pages 489-500, April.
    3. Filiz, Ibrahim & Nahmer, Thomas & Spiwoks, Markus, 2019. "Herd behavior and mood: An experimental study on the forecasting of share prices," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(C).
    4. Ackert, Lucy F. & Church, Bryan K. & Zhang, Ping, 2018. "Informed traders’ performance and the information environment: Evidence from experimental asset markets," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 1-15.
    5. Georg Weizsacker, 2010. "Do We Follow Others When We Should? A Simple Test of Rational Expectations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2340-2360, December.
    6. Grebe, Tim & Schmid, Julia & Stiehler, Andreas, 2008. "Do individuals recognize cascade behavior of others? - An experimental study," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 197-209, April.
    7. Shunichiro Sasaki, 2004. "Signal Qualities, Order of Decisions, and Informational Cascades: Experimental Evidences," ISER Discussion Paper 0621, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    8. Dorothea Kübler & Georg Weizsäcker, 2004. "Limited Depth of Reasoning and Failure of Cascade Formation in the Laboratory," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(2), pages 425-441.
    9. Dominitz, Jeff & Hung, Angela A., 2009. "Empirical models of discrete choice and belief updating in observational learning experiments," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 94-109, February.
    10. Jonathan E. Alevy & Michael S. Haigh & John A. List, 2007. "Information Cascades: Evidence from a Field Experiment with Financial Market Professionals," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(1), pages 151-180, February.
    11. Thomas Gehrig & Werner Güth & René Levínský, 2016. "On the Value of Transparency and Information Acquisition in Bargaining," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 17(3), pages 337-358, August.
    12. Anthony Ziegelmeyer & Frédéric Koessler & Juergen Bracht & Eyal Winter, 2010. "Fragility of information cascades: an experimental study using elicited beliefs," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 13(2), pages 121-145, June.
    13. Cao, Qian & Li, Jianbiao & Niu, Xiaofei, 2019. "The role of overconfidence in overweighting private information: Does gender matter?," EconStor Preprints 203448, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    14. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:3:y:2005:i:34:p:1-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Paul J. Healy & John Conlon & Yeochang Yoon, 2016. "Information Cascades with Informative Ratings: An Experimental Test," Working Papers 16-05, Ohio State University, Department of Economics.
    16. Yang, Wan-Ru, 2011. "Herding with costly information and signal extraction," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 624-632, October.
    17. Shunichiro Sasaki, 2005. "Signal Qualities, Order of Decisions, and Informational Cascades: Experimental Evidence," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 3(34), pages 1-11.
    18. Hilary, Gilles & Hsu, Charles, 2011. "Endogenous overconfidence in managerial forecasts," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 300-313, April.
    19. Van Parys, Jessica & Ash, Elliott, 2018. "Sequential decision-making with group identity," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 1-18.
    20. Baethge, Caroline & Fiedler, Marina, 2016. "All or (almost) nothing? The influence of information cost and training on information selection and the quality of decision-making," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Betriebswirtschaftliche Reihe B-19-16, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.
    21. Andrew Healy, 2009. "How effectively do people learn from a variety of different opinions?," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 12(4), pages 386-416, December.
    22. Oberhammer, Clemens & Stiehler, Andreas, 2001. "Does cascade behavior in information cascades reflect Bayesian updating? An experimental study," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 2001,32, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    information aggregation ; information acquisition ; Bayes’ rule ; heuristics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior

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