IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/qmw/qmwecw/wp673.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A Nonlinear Panel Model of Cross-sectional Dependence

Author

Listed:
  • George Kapetanios

    () (Queen Mary, University of London)

  • James Mitchell

    (NIESR)

  • Yongcheol Shin

    (University of Leeds)

Abstract

This paper proposes a new panel model of cross-sectional dependence. The model has a number of potential structural interpretations that relate to economic phenomena such as herding in financial markets. On an econometric level it provides a flexible approach to the modelling of interactions across panel units and can generate endogenous cross-sectional dependence that can resemble such dependence arising in a variety of existing models such as factor or spatial models. We discuss the theoretical properties of the model and ways in which inference can be carried out. We supplement this analysis with a detailed Monte Carlo study and two empirical illustrations.

Suggested Citation

  • George Kapetanios & James Mitchell & Yongcheol Shin, 2010. "A Nonlinear Panel Model of Cross-sectional Dependence," Working Papers 673, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
  • Handle: RePEc:qmw:qmwecw:wp673
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.econ.qmul.ac.uk/media/econ/research/workingpapers/archive/wp673.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andros Kourtellos & Thanasis Stengos & Chih Ming Tan, 2008. "THRET: Threshold Regression with Endogenous Threshold Variables," Working Paper series 05_08, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    2. George A. Akerlof, 2009. "How Human Psychology Drives the Economy and Why It Matters," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1175-1175.
    3. Itzhak Gilboa & Offer Lieberman & David Schmeidler, 2006. "Empirical Similarity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 433-444.
    4. Guidolin, Massimo & Hyde, Stuart & McMillan, David & Ono, Sadayuki, 2009. "Non-linear predictability in stock and bond returns: When and where is it exploitable?," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, pages 373-399.
    5. Kapetanios, G., 1999. "Model Selection in Threshold Models," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9906, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    6. Gregory, Allan W & Smith, Gregor W & Yetman, James, 2001. "Testing for Forecast Consensus," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(1), pages 34-43, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cross-sectional dependence; Nonlinearity; Factor models; Panel models; Fixed effects;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:qmw:qmwecw:wp673. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Nicholas Owen). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deqmwuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.