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Does Economic Integration Affect the Structure of Industries? Empirical Evidence from the CEE

  • d'Artis Kancs

In this paper we study how European integration would affect the industry location and sectoral specialisation of local economies in the CEE accession countries. The theoretical framework of our study is based on the new eco- nomic geography, which allows us to predict not only the post-integration spe- cialisation patterns, but captures also other general equilibrium eects, such as transition to market economy, which turn out to be highly significant in CEE. Our empirical results suggest that the CEE specialisation pattern would be distinct from the old EU member states. First, the EU integration would reduce regional specialisation in CEE. Second, the bell-shaped specialisation pattern predicted by the underlying theoretical framework is inverse in CEE. We could explain a large portion of these dierences by CEE-specific processes, such as integration of the CMEA. These distortions are higher in those regions, which were more integrated in the CMEA. Our simulation results also suggest a convergence in the specialisation across the CEE regions.

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File URL: http://www.econ.kuleuven.be/licos/publications/dp/dp195.pdf
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Paper provided by LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven in its series LICOS Discussion Papers with number 19507.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Handle: RePEc:lic:licosd:19507
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  1. Krugman, Paul R & Venables, Anthony J, 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(4), pages 857-80, November.
  2. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-99, June.
  3. Rikard Forslid & Jan I. Haaland & Karen Helene M. Knarvik & Ottar Maestad, 2002. "Integration and transition: Scenarios for the location of production and trade in Europe," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 10(1), pages 93-117, March.
  4. Karl Aiginger & Stephen W. Davies, 2004. "Industrial specialisation and geographic concentration: Two sides of the same coin? Not for the European Union," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 0, pages 231-248, November.
  5. Julda Kielyte, 2008. "Estimating Panel Data Models in the Presence of Endogeneity and Selection," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 51(2), pages 1-19.
  6. J. Peter Neary, 2000. "Of Hype and Hyperbolas - Introducing the new Economic Geography," Working Papers 200019, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  7. Ottaviano, Gianmarco & Puga, Diego, 1997. "Agglomeration in the Global Economy: A Survey of the 'New Economic Geography'," CEPR Discussion Papers 1699, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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