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Impatience and Immediacy: A Quasi-Hyperbolic Discounting Approach to Smoking Behavior

  • Takanori Ida

This paper investigates smoking status, including nicotine dependence, on the basis of a quasi-hyperbolic discounting approach. This approach reconciles the traditional rational addiction model and the bounded rational addiction model. The paper measures two key parameters: impatience, in line with the former model, and immediacy, in line with the latter model. There are two main conclusions. First, the impatience and immediacy parameters are positively associated with smoking probability. Second, they are positively associated with nicotine dependence.

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File URL: http://www.econ.kyoto-u.ac.jp/projectcenter/Paper/e-11-010.pdf
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Paper provided by Graduate School of Economics Project Center, Kyoto University in its series Discussion papers with number e-11-010.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kue:dpaper:e-11-010
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  1. Drazen Prelec, 2004. "Decreasing Impatience: A Criterion for Non-stationary Time Preference and "Hyperbolic" Discounting," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(3), pages 511-532, October.
  2. Kamhon Kan, 2006. "Cigarette smoking and self-control," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 06-A004, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
  3. Akerlof, George A, 1991. "Procrastination and Obedience," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 1-19, May.
  4. Messinis, George, 1999. " Habit Formation and the Theory of Addiction," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(4), pages 417-42, September.
  5. Laibson, David I., 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," Scholarly Articles 4481499, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  6. Ida, Takanori, 2010. "Anomaly, impulsivity, and addiction," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 194-203, April.
  7. Ernst Fehr & Peter K. Zych, 2003. "Do Addicts Behave Rationally?," Experimental 0305002, EconWPA.
  8. Bhat, Chandra R., 2001. "Quasi-random maximum simulated likelihood estimation of the mixed multinomial logit model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 677-693, August.
  9. Marjon van der Pol, 2011. "Health, education and time preference," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 917-929, 08.
  10. Clément de Chaisemartin & Pierre‐Yves Geoffard & Anne‐Laurence le Faou, 2011. "Workplace smoking ban effects on unhappy smokers," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(9), pages 1043-1055, 09.
  11. W. Kip Viscusi & Joni Hersch, 2001. "Cigarette Smokers As Job Risk Takers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(2), pages 269-280, May.
  12. Vital Anderhub & Werner Güth & Uri Gneezy & Doron Sonsino, 2001. "On the Interaction of Risk and Time Preferences: An Experimental Study," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 2(3), pages 239-253, 08.
  13. Kenneth Train, 2003. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Online economics textbooks, SUNY-Oswego, Department of Economics, number emetr2.
  14. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy, 1986. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 41, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  15. Shane Frederick & George Loewenstein & Ted O'Donoghue, 2002. "Time Discounting and Time Preference: A Critical Review," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 351-401, June.
  16. Steffen Andersen & Glenn W. Harrison & Morten I. Lau & E. Elisabet Rutström, 2008. "Eliciting Risk and Time Preferences," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 76(3), pages 583-618, 05.
  17. Takanori Ida & Rei Goto, 2009. "Simultaneous Measurement Of Time And Risk Preferences: Stated Preference Discrete Choice Modeling Analysis Depending On Smoking Behavior," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1169-1182, November.
  18. Becker, Gary S & Mulligan, Casey B, 1997. "The Endogenous Determination of Time Preference," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(3), pages 729-58, August.
  19. Marjon van der Pol & John Cairns, 2011. "Descriptive validity of alternative intertemporal models for health outcomes: an axiomatic test," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(7), pages 770-782, July.
  20. Blondel, Serge & Loheac, Youenn & Rinaudo, Stephane, 2007. "Rationality and drug use: An experimental approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 643-658, May.
  21. Jonathan Gruber & Botond Köszegi, 2001. "Is Addiction "Rational"? Theory And Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1261-1303, November.
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