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Anomaly, impulsivity, and addiction

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  • Ida, Takanori

Abstract

There are two behavioral approaches to addiction: rational and irrational. The rational approach assumes that addicts have higher time preference rates and lower risk-aversion coefficients--parameters that are interpreted as impulsive preferences. On the other hand, the irrational approach argues that addiction is a consequence of anomalies such as non-expected utility and hyperbolically discounted utility. This paper integrates these two approaches and concludes that anomaly and impulsivity complementarily account for addiction.

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  • Ida, Takanori, 2010. "Anomaly, impulsivity, and addiction," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 194-203, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:39:y:2010:i:2:p:194-203
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Takanori Ida, 2014. "A quasi-hyperbolic discounting approach to smoking behavior," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 1-11, December.
    2. Kang, Myong-Il & Ikeda, Shinsuke, 2016. "Time discounting, present biases, and health-related behaviors: Evidence from Japan," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 122-136.
    3. Takanori Ida, 2012. "Impatience and Immediacy: A Quasi-Hyperbolic Discounting Approach to Smoking Behavior," Discussion papers e-11-010, Graduate School of Economics Project Center, Kyoto University.

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