IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

A Comparison between Latent Class Model and Mixed Logit Model for Transport Mode Choice: Evidences from Two Datasets of Japan

  • Junyi Shen

    ()

    (Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University)

  • Yusuke Sakata

    (School of Economics, Kinki University)

  • Yoshizo Hashimoto

    (Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University)

This paper applies two recent stated choice survey datasets of Japan to investigate the difference between the latent class model (LCM) and the mixed logit model (MLM) for transport mode choice. A detailed comparison is carried out, focusing on comparing values of time savings, direct choice elasticities, predicted choice probabilities and prediction success indices. Furthermore, a test on non-nested model is also utilized to help determine which model is superior to another one. The results suggest that the LCM performs better than the MLM in both datasets.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www2.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/global/dp/0605.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) in its series Discussion Papers in Economics and Business with number 06-05.

as
in new window

Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:0605
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Kenneth Train, 2003. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Online economics textbooks, SUNY-Oswego, Department of Economics, number emetr2, March.
  2. Sándor, Zsolt & Train, Kenneth, 2004. "Quasi-random simulation of discrete choice models," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 313-327, May.
  3. Yusuke Sakata & Junyi Shen & Yoshizo Hashimoto, 2006. "The Influence of Environmental Deterioration and Network Improvement on Transport Modal Choice," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 06-04, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  4. Greene, William H. & Hensher, David A., 2003. "A latent class model for discrete choice analysis: contrasts with mixed logit," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 681-698, September.
  5. Bhat, Chandra R. & Gossen, Rachel, 2004. "A mixed multinomial logit model analysis of weekend recreational episode type choice," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 767-787, November.
  6. Bhat, Chandra R., 2003. "Simulation estimation of mixed discrete choice models using randomized and scrambled Halton sequences," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 837-855, November.
  7. Junyi Shen, 2005. "A Review of Stated Choice Method," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 05-27, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  8. Daniel McFadden, 1977. "Quantitative Methods for Analyzing Travel Behaviour of Individuals: Some Recent Developments," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 474, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  9. Bhat, Chandra R., 2001. "Quasi-random maximum simulated likelihood estimation of the mixed multinomial logit model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 677-693, August.
  10. Daniel McFadden & Kenneth Train, 2000. "Mixed MNL models for discrete response," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(5), pages 447-470.
  11. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521788304 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Provencher, Bill & Bishop, R.C.Richard C., 2004. "Does accounting for preference heterogeneity improve the forecasting of a random utility model? A case study," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 793-810, July.
  13. Junyi Shen & Yusuke Sakata & Yoshizo Hashimoto, 2008. "Is individual environmental consciousness one of the determinants in transport mode choice?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(10), pages 1229-1239.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:0605. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Atsuko SUZUKI)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.