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Health, education and time preference

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  • Marjon van der Pol

Abstract

Education has been shown to be the most important correlate of health. However, the mechanism through which education influences health has been largely unexplained. Grossman argued that education improves health production efficiency. In contrast, Fuchs argued that the association between health and education is not primarily causal but reflects unobserved causes of both outcomes. Instead of education causing better health, some ‘third’ variables may be related to both education and health. The ‘third’ variable most frequently mentioned is time preference. The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of time preference in the relationship between education and health. The role of risk attitude is also investigated. The paper exploits a unique data set of households that incorporated stated preference questions eliciting individuals' time preferences. The results show that the effect of education reduces but does not disappear when controlling for individuals' time preferences. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Marjon van der Pol, 2011. "Health, education and time preference," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 917-929, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:20:y:2011:i:8:p:917-929
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1655
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.1655
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    Cited by:

    1. Aizawa, Toshiaki & Helble, Matthias, 2015. "Health and Home Ownership: Findings for the Case of Japan," ADBI Working Papers 525, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    2. Michael Grossman, 2015. "The Relationship between Health and Schooling: What's New?," Working Papers 8, City University of New York Graduate Center, Ph.D. Program in Economics.
    3. Takagi, Daisuke & Kondo, Naoki & Takada, Misato & Hashimoto, Hideki, 2016. "Educational attainment, time preference, and health-related behaviors: A mediation analysis from the J-SHINE survey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 116-122.
    4. Galizzi, Matteo M. & Miraldo, Marisa & Stavropoulou, Charitini & van der Pol, Marjon, 2016. "Doctor–patient differences in risk and time preferences: A field experiment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 171-182.
    5. Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2018. "Les attentes en termes de services pour les seniors : le rôle de l’altruisme et de l’anticipation de la dépendance," Revue française d'économie, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(2), pages 15-74.
    6. David Bradford & Charles Courtemanche & Garth Heutel & Patrick McAlvanah & Christopher Ruhm, 2017. "Time preferences and consumer behavior," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 55(2), pages 119-145, December.
    7. Bénédicte H. Apouey, 2019. "Intérêt des adhérents d'une mutuelle pour des services utilisant leurs données personnelles dans le cadre de la médecine personnalisée," PSE Working Papers halshs-02295392, HAL.
    8. Jared C. Carbone & Snorre Kverndokk, 2017. "Individual Investments in Education and Health: Policy Responses and Interactions," Advances in Health Economics and Health Services Research, in: Kristian Bolin & Björn Lindgren & Michael Grossman & Dorte Gyrd-Hansen & Tor Iversen & Robert Kaestn (ed.),Human Capital and Health Behavior, volume 25, pages 33-83, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    9. Arthur E. Attema & Matthijs M. Versteegh & Mark Oppe & Werner B. F. Brouwer & Elly A. Stolk, 2013. "Lead Time Tto: Leading To Better Health State Valuations?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(4), pages 376-392, April.
    10. Hannah Forbes & Eleonora Fichera & Anne Rogers & Matt Sutton, 2017. "The Effects of Exercise and Relaxation on Health and Wellbeing," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(12), pages 67-80, December.
    11. Damien Bricard & Florence Jusot, 2012. "Milieu d’origine, situation sociale et parcours tabagique en France," Post-Print hal-01593798, HAL.
    12. Apouey, Bénédicte H., 2018. "Preparation for old age in France: The roles of preferences and expectations," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 15-23.
    13. Carbone, Jared C. & Kverndokk, Snorre, 2014. "Individual investments in education and health," HERO Online Working Paper Series 2014:1, University of Oslo, Health Economics Research Programme.
    14. Aniko Biro;, 2012. "An analysis of mammography decisions with a focus on educational differences," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    15. Grytten, Jostein & Skau, Irene, 2017. "The impact of education on the probability of receiving periodontal treatment. Causal effects measured by using the introduction of a school reform in Norway," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 188(C), pages 128-136.
    16. Silvia Mendolia & Ian Walker, 2014. "The Effect Of Noncognitive Traits On Health Behaviours In Adolescence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(9), pages 1146-1158, September.
    17. Grytten, Jostein & Skau, Irene & Sørensen, Rune J., 2014. "Educated mothers, healthy infants. The impact of a school reform on the birth weight of Norwegian infants 1967–2005," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 84-92.
    18. Kim, Younoh & Radoias, Vlad, 2016. "Education, individual time preferences, and asymptomatic disease detection," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 15-22.
    19. Roman Hoffmann & Sebastian Uljas Lutz, 2019. "The health knowledge mechanism: evidence on the link between education and health lifestyle in the Philippines," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 20(1), pages 27-43, February.
    20. de Oliveira, Angela C.M. & Leonard, Tammy C.M. & Shuval, Kerem & Skinner, Celette Sugg & Eckel, Catherine & Murdoch, James C., 2016. "Economic preferences and obesity among a low-income African American community," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 131(PB), pages 196-208.
    21. Åsa Ljungvall & Ulf Gerdtham & Ulf Lindblad, 2015. "Misreporting and misclassification: implications for socioeconomic disparities in body-mass index and obesity," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(1), pages 5-20, January.
    22. Anikó Bíró, 2013. "Discount Rates And The Education Gradient In Mammography In The Uk," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(9), pages 1021-1036, September.
    23. Takanori Ida, 2012. "Impatience and Immediacy: A Quasi-Hyperbolic Discounting Approach to Smoking Behavior," Discussion papers e-11-010, Graduate School of Economics Project Center, Kyoto University.

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