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Human Capital Mismatches along the Career Path

Author

Listed:
  • Ljubica Nedelkoska

    () (Research Training Group "Economics of Innovative Change" at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena)

  • Frank Neffke

    () (Erasmus School of Economics, Rotterdam)

Abstract

Human capital is transferable across occupations, but only to a limited extent because of differences in occupational skill-profiles. Higher skill overlap between occupations renders less of individuals' human capital useless in occupational switches. Current occupational distance measures neglect that differences in skill complexities between occupations yield skill mismatch asymmetric in nature. We propose characterizing occupational switches in terms of human capital shortages and redundancies. This results in superior predictions of individual wages and occupational switches. It also allows identifying career movements up and down an occupational complexity ladder, and assessing the usefulness of accumulated skill-profiles at an individual's current job.

Suggested Citation

  • Ljubica Nedelkoska & Frank Neffke, 2010. "Human Capital Mismatches along the Career Path," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-051, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2010-051
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    File URL: http://pubdb.wiwi.uni-jena.de/pdf/wp_2010_051.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning & Anna Salomons, 2009. "Job Polarization in Europe," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 58-63, May.
    2. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2007. "Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(1), pages 118-133, February.
    3. Batiz-Lazo, Bernardo & Reid, Robert J. K., 2008. "Evidence from the Patent Record on the Development of Cash Dispensing Technology," MPRA Paper 9461, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Christian Dustmann & Johannes Ludsteck & Uta Schönberg, 2009. "Revisiting the German Wage Structure," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(2), pages 843-881.
    5. Alexandra Spitz-Oener, 2006. "Technical Change, Job Tasks, and Rising Educational Demands: Looking outside the Wage Structure," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(2), pages 235-270, April.
    6. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Melissa S. Kearney, 2008. "Trends in U.S. Wage Inequality: Revising the Revisionists," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(2), pages 300-323, May.
    7. Cowan, Robin & Foray, Dominique, 1997. "The Economics of Codification and the Diffusion of Knowledge," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(3), pages 595-622, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zsolt Csafordi & Laszlo Lorincz & Balazs Lengyel & Karoly Miklos Kiss, 2016. "Productivity spillovers through labor flows: The effect of productivity gap, foreign-owned firms, and skill-relatedness," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1610, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    2. Werner Gueth & Hartmut Kliemt, 2013. "Fairness That Money Can Buy. Procedural Egalitarianism in Practice," Rationality, Markets and Morals, Frankfurt School Verlag, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, vol. 4(65), May.
    3. Elisabeth Bublitz & Florian Noseleit, 2011. "The Skill Balancing Act: Determinants of and Returns to Balanced Skills," Jena Economic Research Papers 2011-025, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    4. Sorgner, Alina & Fritsch, Michael, 2013. "Stepping Forward: Personality Traits, Choice of Profession, and the Decision to Become Self-Employed," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79768, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Alina Sorgner & Michael Fritsch, 2013. "Occupational Choice and Self-Employment - Are They Related?," Jena Economic Research Papers 2013-001, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    skill mismatch; skill transferability; occupational change; human capital; wages;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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