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Farming strategy of African smallholder farmers in transition from traditional to alternative agriculture : the case of the Nupe in central Nigeria

Author

Listed:
  • Abe, Shin
  • Takahashi, Ryo
  • Haruna, Akiko
  • Yamaji, Eiji
  • Wakatsuki, Toshiyuki

Abstract

It is worthwhile to understand farming strategies of smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, especially those of farmers who are in transition from traditional to alternative agriculture in terms of adoption of innovative technologies. In a case study of inland valleys in central Nigeria, we investigated the farming strategy of Nupe farmers who have a long-term tradition of wet rice cultivation and indigenous methods of land preparation for soil, water and weed management. In this region, a new method of land preparation has recently been introduced along with a recommendation to use improved seeds and chemical fertilizers. Our findings reveal that Nupe farmers directly sow traditional seeds and apply a marginal amount of fertilizer to paddy plots prepared by labor-saving methods on drought-prone hydromorphic valley fringes and flood-susceptible valley bottoms, whereas they preferentially transplanted improved seedlings and applied a relatively large quantity of fertilizer to paddy fields prepared by a labor-intensive and mechanized method on a valley position where they can access to optimum water condition (less risky against the drought and flood).

Suggested Citation

  • Abe, Shin & Takahashi, Ryo & Haruna, Akiko & Yamaji, Eiji & Wakatsuki, Toshiyuki, 2012. "Farming strategy of African smallholder farmers in transition from traditional to alternative agriculture : the case of the Nupe in central Nigeria," IDE Discussion Papers 355, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper355
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    File URL: https://ir.ide.go.jp/?action=repository_action_common_download&item_id=37819&item_no=1&attribute_id=22&file_no=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Keijiro OTSUKA & Kaliappa P. KALIRAJAN, 2006. "Rice Green Revolution In Asia And Its Transferability To Africa: An Introduction," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 44(2), pages 107-122.
    2. Pedro Sanchez & Glenn Denning & Generose Nziguheba, 2009. "The African Green Revolution moves forward," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 1(1), pages 37-44, February.
    3. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
    4. Dalton, Timothy J. & Guei, Robert G., 2003. "Productivity Gains from Rice Genetic Enhancements in West Africa: Countries and Ecologies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 359-374, February.
    5. Takeshi SAKURAI, 2006. "Intensification Of Rainfed Lowland Rice Production In West Africa: Present Status And Potential Green Revolution," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 44(2), pages 232-251.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Nigeria; Agriculture; Agricultural technology; Farming techniques; Rice; Indigenous knowledge; Land preparation method; Rice cultivation; Risk management; Technology adoption;

    JEL classification:

    • N57 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services

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