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Wage Compression within the Firm

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  • Leonardi, Marco

    () (University of Milan)

  • Pellizzari, Michele

    () (University of Geneva)

  • Tabasso, Domenico

    () (UNHCR)

Abstract

We study the distributional effect of a wage indexation mechanism - the Scala Mobile (SM) - that heavily compressed the distribution of Italian wages during the 1970s and 1980s. The SM imposed large real wage increases at the bottom of the distribution and was essentially irrelevant for high-wage workers. We document that this mechanism triggered a strong redistribution within the firm. Skilled workers received lower wage adjustments when employed at firms with many unskilled workers and they tended to move towards more skill-intensive firms. We rationalize these findings with a simplified model of intra-firm bargaining with on-the- job search.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonardi, Marco & Pellizzari, Michele & Tabasso, Domenico, 2015. "Wage Compression within the Firm," IZA Discussion Papers 9254, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9254
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Devicienti & Bernardo Fanfani & Agata Maida, 2019. "Collective Bargaining and the Evolution of Wage Inequality in Italy," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 57(2), pages 377-407, June.
    2. Dong-One Kim & Ji-Young Ahn, 2018. "From Authoritarianism to Democratic Corporatism? The Rise and Decline of Social Dialogue in Korea," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(12), pages 1-20, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    wage indexation; inequality; intra-firm bargaining; labor market institutions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General

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