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Agricultural Extension and Technology Adoption for Food Security: Evidence from Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Pan, Yao

    () (Aalto University)

  • Smith, Stephen C.

    () (George Washington University)

  • Sulaiman, Munshi

    () (Save the Children)

Abstract

This paper evaluates causal impacts of a large-scale agricultural extension program for smallholder women farmers on food security in Uganda through a regression discontinuity design that exploits an arbitrary distance-to-branch threshold for village program eligibility. We find eligible farmers experienced significant increases in agricultural production, savings and wage income, which lead to improved food security. Given minimal changes in the adoption of relatively expensive inputs including HYV seeds, these gains are mainly attributed to increased usage of improved cultivation methods that are relatively costless. These results highlight the role of improved basic methods in boosting agricultural productivity among poor farmers.

Suggested Citation

  • Pan, Yao & Smith, Stephen C. & Sulaiman, Munshi, 2015. "Agricultural Extension and Technology Adoption for Food Security: Evidence from Uganda," IZA Discussion Papers 9206, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9206
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen C. Smith & Ram Fishman & Vida BobicÌ & Munshi Sulaiman, 2017. "How Sustainable Are Benefits from Extension for Smallholder Farmers? Evidence from a Randomised Phase-Out of the BRAC Program in Uganda," Working Papers 2017-1, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    2. Singhal Saurabh & Pan Yao, 2015. "Income and Malaria: Evidence from an agricultural intervention in Uganda," WIDER Working Paper Series 092, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Abdoulaye Diagne Author-Name: Fran ois J. Cabral, 2017. "Agricultural Transformation in Senegal: Impacts of an integrated program," Working Papers PMMA 2017-09, PEP-PMMA.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    agriculture; extension; agricultural technology adoption; food security; regression discontinuity; Uganda; labor markets in developing economies;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General

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