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Do the Unemployed Accept Jobs Too Quickly? A Comparison with Employed Job Seekers

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  • Longhi, Simonetta

    () (University of Reading)

Abstract

This paper analyses differences between unemployed and employed job seekers in job finding rates and in the quality of the job found. Compared to the unemployed, employed job seekers have a smaller pool of job offers that they consider acceptable; this leads to lower job finding rates but better quality jobs. Differences in job quality are tiny when unobserved heterogeneity and selection into accepting a job are accounted for. Hence, differences are mostly due to behaviour of unemployed people rather than negative signaling or employer discrimination.

Suggested Citation

  • Longhi, Simonetta, 2015. "Do the Unemployed Accept Jobs Too Quickly? A Comparison with Employed Job Seekers," IZA Discussion Papers 9112, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9112
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    on-the-job search; unemployment; job-finding rate; job quality;

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J29 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Other
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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