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The Effect of Overskilling Dynamics on Wages

Author

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  • Mavromaras, Kostas G.

    () (NILS, Flinders University)

  • Mahuteau, Stephane

    () (University of Adelaide)

  • Sloane, Peter J.

    () (Swansea University)

  • Wei, Zhang

    () (NILS, Flinders University)

Abstract

We use a random effects dynamic probit model to estimate the effect of overskilling dynamics on wages. We find that overskilling mismatch is common and more likely among those who have been overskilled in the past. It is also highly persistent, in a manner that is inversely related to educational level. Yet, the wages of university graduates are reduced more by past overskilling, than for any other education level. A possible reason for this wage effect is that graduates tend to be in better-paid jobs and therefore there is more at stake for them if they get it wrong.

Suggested Citation

  • Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Mahuteau, Stephane & Sloane, Peter J. & Wei, Zhang, 2012. "The Effect of Overskilling Dynamics on Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 6985, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6985
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2005. "Simple solutions to the initial conditions problem in dynamic, nonlinear panel data models with unobserved heterogeneity," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 39-54.
    2. Kostas Mavromaras & Peter Sloane & Zhang Wei, 2012. "The role of education pathways in the relationship between job mismatch, wages and job satisfaction: a panel estimation approach," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 303-321, February.
    3. Kostas Mavromaras & Seamus Mcguinness & Nigel O'Leary & Peter Sloane & Yi King Fok, 2010. "The Problem Of Overskilling In Australia And Britain," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 78(3), pages 219-241, June.
    4. Bell, David N.F. & Blanchflower, David G., 2010. "Youth Unemployment: Déjà Vu?," IZA Discussion Papers 4705, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Kostas Mavromaras & Seamus Mcguinness & Yin King Fok, 2009. "Assessing the Incidence and Wage Effects of Overskilling in the Australian Labour Market," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 85(268), pages 60-72, March.
    6. Mavromaras, Kostas & McGuinness, Seamus, 2012. "Overskilling dynamics and education pathways," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 619-628.
    7. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
    8. Wiji Arulampalam & Mark B. Stewart, 2009. "Simplified Implementation of the Heckman Estimator of the Dynamic Probit Model and a Comparison with Alternative Estimators," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(5), pages 659-681, October.
    9. Mavromaras, Kostas & McGuinness, Seamus & O?Leary, Nigel & Sloane, Peter & Fok, Yin King, 2009. "Job Mismatches and Labour Market Outcomes," Papers WP314, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eme:rleczz:s0147-912120170000045003 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Clark, Brian & Joubert, Clement & Maurel, Arnaud, 2014. "The Career Prospects of Overeducated Americans," IZA Discussion Papers 8313, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Peter J. Sloane, 2014. "Overeducation, skill mismatches, and labor market outcomes for college graduates," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-88, November.
    4. Muge Adalet McGowan & Dan Andrews, 2015. "Skill Mismatch and Public Policy in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1210, OECD Publishing.
    5. Seamus McGuinness & Konstantinos Pouliakas, 2017. "Deconstructing Theories of Overeducation in Europe: A Wage Decomposition Approach," Research in Labor Economics,in: Skill Mismatch in Labor Markets, volume 45, pages 81-127 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    6. Brian Clark & Arnaud Maurel & Clement Joubert, 2014. "Career Prospects of Overeducated Americans," 2014 Meeting Papers 400, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    panel dynamic estimation; mismatch; overskilling; wages;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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