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Assessing the Incidence and Wage Effects of Overskilling in the Australian Labour Market

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  • KOSTAS MAVROMARAS
  • SEAMUS MCGUINNESS
  • YIN KING FOK

Abstract

This paper examines the incidence and wage effects of overskilling in Australia. It finds that approximately 30 per cent of employees believed themselves to be moderately overskilled and 11 per cent believed themselves to be severely overskilled. The incidence of skills mismatch varied little when the sample was split by education. After controlling for individual and job characteristics as well as the potential bias arising from individual unobserved heterogeneity, severely overskilled workers suffer an average wage penalty of 10.2 per cent with the penalty ranging from about 6 per cent among vocationally qualified employees to just less than 20 per cent for graduates. Copyright © 2009 The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Kostas Mavromaras & Seamus Mcguinness & Yin King Fok, 2009. "Assessing the Incidence and Wage Effects of Overskilling in the Australian Labour Market," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 85(268), pages 60-72, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:85:y:2009:i:268:p:60-72
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Seamus McGuinness, 2007. "How biased are the estimated wage impacts of overeducation? A propensity score matching approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 145-149.
    2. Sattinger, Michael, 1993. "Assignment Models of the Distribution of Earnings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 31(2), pages 831-880, June.
    3. Séamus McGuinness, 2006. "Overeducation in the Labour Market," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 387-418, July.
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    5. Ingrid Linsley, 2005. "Causes of Overeducation in the Australian Labour Market," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 8(2), pages 121-143, June.
    6. Derby Voon & Paul W. Miller, 2005. "Undereducation and Overeducation in the Australian Labour Market," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 81(s1), pages 22-33, August.
    7. Nicole Watson & Mark Wooden, 2004. "The HILDA Survey Four Years On," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 37(3), pages 343-349, September.
    8. Francis Green & Steven McIntosh, 2007. "Is there a genuine under-utilization of skills amongst the over-qualified?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(4), pages 427-439.
    9. Parvinder Kler, 2005. "Graduate overeducation in Australia: A comparison of the mean and objective methods," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 47-72.
    10. Ingrid Linsley, 2005. "Overeducation in the Australian Labour Market : Its Incidence and Effects," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 939, The University of Melbourne.
    11. Ingrid Linsley, 2005. "Causes of Overeducation in the Australian Labour Market," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 940, The University of Melbourne.
    12. Sascha O. Becker & Andrea Ichino, 2002. "Estimation of average treatment effects based on propensity scores," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(4), pages 358-377, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nuria Sánchez-Sánchez & Adolfo Fernández, 2014. "Desajuste educacional y de competencias: efectos diferenciales sobre la satisfacción laboral. Un estudio aplicado al mercado de trabajo español," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 41(2 Year 20), pages 261-281, December.
    2. Kostas Mavromaras & Stéphane Mahuteau & Peter Sloane & Zhang Wei, 2013. "The effect of overskilling dynamics on wages," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 281-303, July.
    3. Matloob Piracha & Massimiliano Tani & Florin Vadean, 2012. "Immigrant over- and under-education: the role of home country labour market experience," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-21, December.
    4. Elena Bárcena-Martín & Santiago Budría & Ana I. Moro-Egido, 2012. "Skill mismatches and wages among European university graduates," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(15), pages 1471-1475, October.
    5. McGuinness, Seamus & Sloane, Peter J., 2011. "Labour market mismatch among UK graduates: An analysis using REFLEX data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 130-145, February.
    6. repec:taf:edecon:v:25:y:2017:i:5:p:462-481 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Schwalje, Wes, 2011. "A Conceptual Model of National Skills Formation for Knowledge-based Economic Development," MPRA Paper 30302, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Whelan, Adele & McGuinness, Seamus, 2017. "Does a Satisfied Student Make a Satisfied Worker?," IZA Discussion Papers 10698, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Schwalje, Wes, 2011. "Knowledge-based Economic Development as a Unifying Vision in a Post-awakening Arab World," MPRA Paper 30305, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Nuria Sánchez-Sánchez & Seamus McGuinness, 2015. "Decomposing the impacts of overeducation and overskilling on earnings and job satisfaction: an analysis using REFLEX data," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 419-432, August.
    11. Kostas Mavromaras & Seamus McGuinness & Nigel O'Leary & Peter Sloane & Zhang Wei, 2013. "Job Mismatches and Labour Market Outcomes: Panel Evidence on University Graduates," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(286), pages 382-395, September.
    12. Kostas Mavromaras & Peter Sloane & Zhang Wei, 2015. "The scarring effects of unemployment, low pay and skills under-utilization in Australia compared," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(23), pages 2413-2429, May.
    13. Eleni Kalfa & Matloob Piracha, 2017. "Immigrants’ educational mismatch and the penalty of over-education," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(5), pages 462-481, September.
    14. Lamo, Ana & Messina, Julián, 2010. "Formal education, mismatch and wages after transition: Assessing the impact of unobserved heterogeneity using matching estimators," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1086-1099, December.
    15. Alison L. Booth & Pamela Katic, 2011. "Men at Work in a Land Down‐Under: Testing Some Predictions of Human Capital Theory," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 49(1), pages 1-24, March.
    16. Mavromaras, Kostas & McGuinness, Seamus, 2012. "Overskilling dynamics and education pathways," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 619-628.
    17. Davia, Maria A. & McGuinness, Seamus & O'Connell, Philip J., 2016. "Determinants of Regional Differences in Rates of Overeducation in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 10250, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Guillermo Montt, 2017. "Field-of-study mismatch and overqualification: labour market correlates and their wage penalty," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-20, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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