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Political Economy of Immigration in Germany: Attitudes and Citizenship Aspirations

Author

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  • Kahanec, Martin

    () (Central European University)

  • Tosun, Mehmet S.

    () (University of Nevada, Reno)

Abstract

This paper examines resident foreigners’ interest in German citizenship. The study focuses on the roles played by attitudes towards foreigners, political interest of foreigners, intergenerational conflict between natives and foreigners and among foreigners themselves, and regional differences in public finances. To address our research questions, we use a unique dataset from a survey of foreign residents in the German States provided by the Central Archive for Empirical Social Science Research of the University of Cologne. We find that some of the significant negative factors that affect citizenship interest are negative attitudes towards foreigners and generational conflict within foreigner families. On the other hand, interest in political participation, German schooling, home ownership, being born in Germany and being a citizen of non-EU country are important positive factors. Negative experience of foreigners in terms of hostile attitudes, lack of voting rights, or uncertainty of the possibility to stay in Germany mainly discourage foreign residents who actively participate in the labor market, have more years of schooling, and are younger.

Suggested Citation

  • Kahanec, Martin & Tosun, Mehmet S., 2007. "Political Economy of Immigration in Germany: Attitudes and Citizenship Aspirations," IZA Discussion Papers 3140, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3140
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bauer, Thomas K. & Lofstrom, Magnus & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2000. "Immigration Policy, Assimilation of Immigrants and Natives' Sentiments towards Immigrants: Evidence from 12 OECD-Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 187, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "Migration and Globalization: Challenges and Perspectives for the Research Infrastructure," IZA Discussion Papers 3890, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Amelie F. Constant & Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2011. "An Expert Stakeholder’s View on European Integration Challenges," Chapters,in: Ethnic Diversity in European Labor Markets, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Artjoms Ivļevs & Roswitha King, 2012. "From immigrants to (non-)citizens: political economy of naturalisations in Latvia," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-23, December.
    4. Kahanec, Martin, 2012. "Report No. 49: Skilled Labor Flows: Lessons from the European Union," IZA Research Reports 49, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    voting; attitudes; citizenship; immigration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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