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An Expert Stakeholder's View on European Integration Challenges

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  • Amelie Constant
  • Martin Kahanec
  • Klaus F. Zimmermann

Abstract

The standard approach of analysing gaps in social and labor market outcomes of different ethnic groups relies on analysis of statistical data about the affected groups. In this paper we go beyond this approach by measuring the views of expert stakeholders involved in minority integration. This enables us to better understand the risk of minority exclusion; the inner nature of discrimination, negative attitudes and internal barriers; as well as the ethnic minorities' desires and perceptions about which approaches are better than others in dealing with integration challenges. Main findings are that ethnic minorities do want to change their situation, especially in terms of employment, education, housing and attitudes towards them. Insufficient knowledge of the official language, insufficient education, discriminatory attitudes and behavior towards ethnic minorities as well as institutional barriers, such as citizenship or legal restrictions, seem to constitute the key barriers to their social and labor market integration.

Suggested Citation

  • Amelie Constant & Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2011. "An Expert Stakeholder's View on European Integration Challenges," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1095, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1095
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amelie F. Constant & Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2009. "Attitudes towards immigrants, other integration barriers, and their veracity," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(1/2), pages 5-14, March.
    2. Bauer, Thomas K. & Lofstrom, Magnus & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2000. "Immigration Policy, Assimilation of Immigrants and Natives' Sentiments towards Immigrants: Evidence from 12 OECD-Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 187, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Kahanec, Martin & Tosun, Mehmet S., 2007. "Political Economy of Immigration in Germany: Attitudes and Citizenship Aspirations," IZA Discussion Papers 3140, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Hainmueller, Jens & Hiscox, Michael J., 2007. "Educated Preferences: Explaining Attitudes Toward Immigration in Europe," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(2), pages 399-442, April.
    5. Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Kahanec, Martin & Constant, Amelie F. & DeVoretz, Don J. & Gataullina, Liliya & Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2008. "Study on the Social and Labour Market Integration of Ethnic Minorities," IZA Research Reports 16, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. O'Rourke, Kevin H. & Sinnott, Richard, 2006. "The determinants of individual attitudes towards immigration," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 838-861, December.
    7. Francisco Rivera-Batiz & Myeong-Su Yun & Ira Gang, 2002. "Economic Strain, Ethnic Concentration and Attitudes Towards Foreigners in the European Union," Departmental Working Papers 200214, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Kahanec & Martin Guzi & Monika Martišková & Michal Paleník & Filip Pertold & Zuzana Siebertová, 2013. "GINI Country Report: The Czech Republic and Slovakia," Research Reports 7, Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).
    2. Werner Eichhorst & Corrado Giulietti & Martin Guzi & Michael J. Kendzia & Paola Monti & Tommaso Frattini & Peter Huber & Klaus Nowotny & Barbara Vandeweghe, 2011. "The Integration of Migrants and its Effects on the Labour Market," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 42955.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Attitudes; opinions; immigrants; ethnic minorities; labor market;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J78 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Public Policy (including comparable worth)

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