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Working from Home in Developing Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Gottlieb, Charles

    (University of St. Gallen)

  • Grobovsek, Jan

    (University of Edinburgh)

  • Poschke, Markus

    (McGill University)

  • Saltiel, Fernando

    (McGill University)

Abstract

We examine workers' ability to work from home, as well as their propensity to actually work from home in developing countries. We use worker-level STEP data covering the task content of jobs to measure the ability to work from home. While the ability to WFH is low in developing countries, it exhibits significant heterogeneity across and within occupations and worker characteristics. Patterns of actual work from home in data from Brazil and Costa Rica align closely with those predicted based on STEP data, in terms of both overall levels and variation with occupation and individual characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Gottlieb, Charles & Grobovsek, Jan & Poschke, Markus & Saltiel, Fernando, 2020. "Working from Home in Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 13737, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp13737
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    remote work; work from home; tasks; occupations; COVID-19;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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