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Jobs’ amenability is not enough: The role of household inputs for safe work under social distancing in Latin American cities

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  • Berniell, Lucila
  • Fernandez, Daniel

Abstract

The recent literature has emphasized the role of occupations in quantifying the amount of telework possible under social distancing measures during the COVID-19 outbreak. However, telework requires not only a teleworkable occupation but also household inputs related to basic infrastructure (internet connection and other housing services) and time availability. We use a recent household survey that includes rich information for large urban areas in 11 Latin American countries and we find that these household inputs are not available for more vulnerable workers. This introduces additional sources of inequality in the possibility of working from home, aside from those imposed by occupations, as well as reinforces the association between economic development and the share of teleworkable jobs. We also analyze the profiles of workers in high personal-proximity jobs, which imply a higher exposure to the virus, and we find important additional sources of inequality. In particular, workers in jobs with higher exposure to the coronavirus also have other health risks, implying that this type of inequality should be carefully taken into account when designing deconfinement measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Berniell, Lucila & Fernandez, Daniel, 2021. "Jobs’ amenability is not enough: The role of household inputs for safe work under social distancing in Latin American cities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 140(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:140:y:2021:i:c:s0305750x20303740
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2020.105247
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    2. Shawana Fazal & Sobia Masood & Farrukh Nazir & Muhammad Iqbal Majoka, 2022. "Individual and Organizational Strategies for Promoting Work–Life Balance for Sustainable Workforce: A Systematic Literature Review from Pakistan," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(18), pages 1-33, September.

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