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Working From Home Under COVID-19: Who Is Affected? Evidence From Latin American and Caribbean Countries

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  • Delaporte, Isaure
  • Peña, Werner

Abstract

Millions of individuals are required to work from home as part of national efforts to fight COVID-19. To evaluate the employment impact of the pandemic, an important point is whether individuals are able to work from home. This paper estimates the share of jobs that can be performed at home in 23 Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries as well as examines the workers' characteristics associated with such jobs. To carry out this analysis, this paper uses rich harmonised household surveys and presents two measures of teleworkability. The first measure of the feasibility of working from home is borrowed from Dingel and Neiman (2020), while the second closely follows the methodology of Saltiel (2020). We use the second measure as our benchmark, as it is based on a more representative task content of occupations for LAC countries. We find that the share of individuals who are able to work from home varies from 7% in Guatemala to 16% in the Bahamas. We document considerable variation in the potential to work from home across occupations, industries, regions and workers' socioeconomic characteristics. Our results show that some individuals are better positioned to cope with the current situation than others. This highlights the need to assist the most vulnerable workers in the context of the global pandemic.

Suggested Citation

  • Delaporte, Isaure & Peña, Werner, 2020. "Working From Home Under COVID-19: Who Is Affected? Evidence From Latin American and Caribbean Countries," GLO Discussion Paper Series 528, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:528
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles Gottlieb & Jan Grobovsek & Markus Poschke, 2020. "Working from Home across Countries," Cahiers de recherche 07-2020, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
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    As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Work from home
    2. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Emerging markets

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    Cited by:

    1. Duman, Anil, 2020. "Wage Losses and Inequality in Developing Countries: labor market and distributional consequences of Covid-19 lockdowns in Turkey," GLO Discussion Paper Series 602, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Nicola Melluso & Andrea Bonaccorsi & Filippo Chiarello & Gualtiero Fantoni, 2021. "Rapid detection of fast innovation under the pressure of COVID-19," Papers 2102.00197, arXiv.org.
    3. Ng, Wung Lik, 2020. "To lockdown? When to peak? Will there be an end? A macroeconomic analysis on COVID-19 epidemic in the United States," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    4. Niembro, Andrés & Calá, Carla Daniela, 2020. "A first exploratory analysis of the regional economic impact of COVID-19 in Argentina," Nülan. Deposited Documents 3376, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales, Centro de Documentación.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    COVID-19; Teleworking; Employment; Demographics;
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