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Who on Earth Can Work from Home ?

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  • Garrote Sanchez,Daniel
  • Gomez Parra,Nicolas
  • Ozden,Caglar
  • Rijkers,Bob
  • Viollaz,Mariana
  • Winkler,Hernan Jorge

Abstract

This paper presents new estimates of the share of jobs that can be performed from home. The analysis is based on the task content of occupations, their information and communications technology requirements, and the availability of internet access by country and income groupings. Globally, one of every five jobs can be performed from home. The ability to telework is correlated with income. In low-income countries, only one of every 26 jobs can be done from home. Failing to account for internet access yields upward biased estimates of the resilience of poor countries, lagging regions, and poor workers. Since better paid workers are more likely to be able to work from home, COVID-19 is likely to exacerbate inequality, especially in richer countries where better paid and educated workers are insulated from the shock. The overall labor market burden of COVID-19 is bound to be larger in poor countries, where only a small share of workers can work from home and social protection systems are weaker. Across the globe, young, poorly educated workers and those on temporary contracts are least likely to be able to work from home and more vulnerable to the labor market shocks from COVID-19.

Suggested Citation

  • Garrote Sanchez,Daniel & Gomez Parra,Nicolas & Ozden,Caglar & Rijkers,Bob & Viollaz,Mariana & Winkler,Hernan Jorge, 2020. "Who on Earth Can Work from Home ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9347, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:9347
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Gottlieb, Charles & Grobovšek, Jan & Poschke, Markus & Saltiel, Fernando, 2021. "Working from home in developing countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 133(C).
    7. Díaz, Carlos & Fossati, Sebastian & Trajtenberg, Nicolás, 2021. "Stay at Home if You Can: COVID-19 Stay-at-Home Guidelines and Local Crime," Working Papers 2021-8, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    8. Kosteas, Vasilios D. & Renna, Francesco & Scicchitano, Sergio, 2022. "Covid-19 and Working from Home: toward a "new normal"?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 1013, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    9. Розинская Н. А. & Розинский И. А., 2021. ""Дачная Перспектива" Удаленной Занятости," Вопросы государственного и муниципального управления // Public administration issues, НИУ ВШЭ, issue 2, pages 87-106.
    10. Gopalakrishnan, Balagopal & Jacob, Joshy & Srivastava, Jagriti, 2022. "Fishing in muddy waters: Mergers and acquisitions during uncertainty," IIMA Working Papers WP 2022-09-02, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
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