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Expanding Health Insurance for the Elderly of the Philippines

Author

Listed:
  • Abrigo, Michael R.M.

    (Philippine Institute for Development Studies)

  • Halliday, Timothy J.

    (University of Hawaii at Manoa)

  • Molina, Teresa

    (University of Hawaii at Manoa)

Abstract

This paper evaluates a Filipino policy that expanded health insurance coverage of its senior citizens, aged 60 and older, in 2014. Using regression discontinuity and difference-in-differences methods, we find that the expansion increases insurance coverage by approximately 16 percentage points. We show that the compliers, those induced by the policy to obtain insurance, are disproportionately female and largely from the middle of the socioeconomic distribution. Instrumental variables estimates indicate that out-of-pocket medical expenditures more than double among the compliers. We argue that this is most likely driven by an outward shift in the medical demand curve.

Suggested Citation

  • Abrigo, Michael R.M. & Halliday, Timothy J. & Molina, Teresa, 2019. "Expanding Health Insurance for the Elderly of the Philippines," IZA Discussion Papers 12827, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12827
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy J. Halliday & Randall Q. Akee, 2020. "The impact of Medicaid on medical utilization in a vulnerable population: Evidence from COFA migrants," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(10), pages 1231-1250, October.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    insurance; medical demand; compliers; Philippines;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality

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