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Motivated to Succeed? Attitudes to Education among Native and Immigrant Pupils in England

Author

Listed:
  • Burgess, Simon

    () (University of Bristol)

  • Heller-Sahlgren, Gabriel

    () (London School of Economics)

Abstract

We study attitudes to education among English adolescents. Using PISA data, we show there is considerable variation in these attitudes depending on background: immigrant students have substantially and significantly more positive attitudes to school than native children, a difference that amounts to around 0.2 standard deviations. There is no difference between first- and second-generation immigrants, and the attitude gap does not appear to depend on particular schools' policies. We also show that students in London have more positive attitudes to education on average, but this is entirely accounted for by the distribution of children of immigrants in that city.

Suggested Citation

  • Burgess, Simon & Heller-Sahlgren, Gabriel, 2018. "Motivated to Succeed? Attitudes to Education among Native and Immigrant Pupils in England," IZA Discussion Papers 11678, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11678
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lex Borghans & Bart Golsteyn & James J. Heckman & John Eric Humphries, 2016. "What Grades and Achievement Tests Measure," Working Papers 2016-022, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Jo Blanden & Ellen Greaves & Paul Gregg & Lindsey Macmillan & Luke Sibieta, 2015. "Understanding the improved performance of disadvantaged pupils in London," CASE - Social Policy in a Cold Climate Working Paper 21, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; human capital; motivation; immigrants;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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