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The Impact of Language on Socioeconomic Integration of Immigrants

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  • Zorlu, Aslan

    () (University of Amsterdam)

  • Hartog, Joop

    () (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

This study examines the causal effects of Dutch language proficiency of immigrants from four main source countries on their labour market and social integration outcomes. Language proficiency appears ranked according to linguistic distance to The Netherlands, a ranking that even holds for the gender gap in proficiency. We assess the effect of language proficiency on two objective indicators of integration (employment and income) and two subjective measures (feeling Dutch and feeling integrated). The analysis shows that endogeneity of language skills masks a substantial part of language effects. Once accounted for endogeneity, effects of Dutch language proficiency on social and economic integration of immigrants are more than double the estimates ignoring endogeneity.

Suggested Citation

  • Zorlu, Aslan & Hartog, Joop, 2018. "The Impact of Language on Socioeconomic Integration of Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 11485, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11485
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    language skills; immigrants; integration; treatment effects;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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