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Postimmigration investments in Education: a Study of Immigrants in the Netherlands

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  • Frank Tubergen

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  • Herman Werfhorst

Abstract

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  • Frank Tubergen & Herman Werfhorst, 2007. "Postimmigration investments in Education: a Study of Immigrants in the Netherlands," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(4), pages 883-898, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:44:y:2007:i:4:p:883-898
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2007.0046
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1998. "Life Cycle Schooling and Dynamic Selection Bias: Models and Evidence for Five Cohorts of American Males," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(2), pages 262-333, April.
    2. James Ted McDonald & Christopher Worswick, 1998. "The Earnings of Immigrant Men in Canada: Job Tenure, Cohort, and Macroeconomic Conditions," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(3), pages 465-482, April.
    3. Friedberg, Rachel M, 2000. "You Can't Take It with You? Immigrant Assimilation and the Portability of Human Capital," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(2), pages 221-251, April.
    4. Kossoudji, Sherrie A, 1988. "English Language Ability and the Labor Market Opportunities of Hispanic and East Asian Immigrant Men," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(2), pages 205-228, April.
    5. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Marie Connolly & Christopher Worswick, 2005. "Post-migration investments in education and job search: a family perspective," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 663-690, November.
    6. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 2001. "Dropout and Enrollment Trends in the Postwar Period: What Went Wrong in the 1970s?," NBER Chapters,in: Risky Behavior among Youths: An Economic Analysis, pages 439-482 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Geoffrey Carliner, 1995. "The Language Ability of U.S. Immigrants: Assimilation and Cohort Effects," NBER Working Papers 5222, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dipanwita Sarkar & Trevor Collier, 2016. "Does Host-Country Education Mitigate Immigrant Inefficiency? Evidence from Earnings of Australian University Graduates," QuBE Working Papers 040, QUT Business School.
    2. Pedro Abrantes & Manuel Abrantes, 2012. "What is the impact of educational systems on social mobility across Europe? A comparative approach," Working Papers wp012012, Socius, Socio-Economics Research Centre at the School of Economics and Management (ISEG) of the Technical University of Lisbon.
    3. Mikal Skuterud & Mingcui Su, 2012. "The influence of measurement error and unobserved heterogeneity in estimating immigrant returns to foreign and host-country sources of human capital," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 1109-1141, December.
    4. Zorlu, Aslan & Hartog, Joop, 2018. "The Impact of Language on Socioeconomic Integration of Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 11485, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Jaap Dronkers & Manon de Heus & Mark Levels, 2012. "Immigrant Pupils' Scientific Performance: The Influence of Educational System Features of Origin and Destination Countries," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1212, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    6. Jaap Dronkers & Manon de Heus, 2012. "Immigrants' Children Scientific Performance in a Double Comparative Design: The Influence of Origin, Destination, and Community," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1213, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    7. Brian Nolan, 2010. "Promoting the Well-Being of Immigrant Youth," Working Papers 201017, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    8. Skuterud, Mikal & Su, Mingcui, 2009. "Immigrant Wage Assimilation and the Return to Foreign and Host-Country Sources of Human Capital," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-38, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 26 Jun 2009.
    9. Martí Franquesa Oliveres & Adrián Zancajo Silla, 2010. "Descomposición del efecto inmigrante en el rendimiento académico en Cataluña según la zona origen," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 5,in: María Jesús Mancebón-Torrubia & Domingo P. Ximénez-de-Embún & José María Gómez-Sancho & Gregorio Gim (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 5, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 5, pages 101-116 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.

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