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New Approaches to the Study of Long-Term Non-Employment Duration in Italy, Germany and Spain

Author

Listed:
  • Contini, Bruno

    () (LABORatorio R. Revelli)

  • Garcia Perez, J. Ignacio

    () (Universidad Pablo de Olavide)

  • Pusch, Toralf

    (Hans Böckler Stiftung)

  • Quaranta, Roberto

    () (Collegio Carlo Alberto)

Abstract

This study proposes a new approach to the analysis of non-employment and its duration in Germany, Italy and Spain using administrative longitudinal databases. Non-employment includes the discouraged unemployed not entitled to draw unemployment benefits and the long-term inactive. Many of the non-employed individuals will never return to the official labour market. We estimate the magnitude and duration of non-employment, applying the survival methodology developed in recent years to deal with 'workforce disposal'. Long-term non-employment (LTNE) may lead to dramatic changes in individual lifestyles, family and childbearing projects, levels of poverty and welfare at large.

Suggested Citation

  • Contini, Bruno & Garcia Perez, J. Ignacio & Pusch, Toralf & Quaranta, Roberto, 2017. "New Approaches to the Study of Long-Term Non-Employment Duration in Italy, Germany and Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 11167, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11167
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor economics; inactivity; long-term unemployment; turnover;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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