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Structure Of Debt Maturity Across Firm Types

Author

Listed:
  • Cuneyt Orman
  • Bulent Koksal

    () (Department of Management, Ipek University)

Abstract

We investigate if and when the leading theories of debt maturity are useful in understanding the maturity choices of non nancial firms in a major developing economy, Turkey. Unlike most research, we use a dataset that provides financial information on not only large, publicly-traded firms but also small, privately-held firms across a wide variety of industries. Our strongest finding is that firms that have high leverage also have long debt maturity. Size, asset maturity, and credit quality are also important, although results depend on the type of firm group considered. The stability of the economic environment as measured by in ation and interest rate volatility also in uences debt maturity decisions. Our findings are broadly consistent with the liquidity risk theory. The agency theory is also partially useful in understanding firms' maturity decisions, particularly for medium- and largesized, publicly-traded firms. The signaling theory is most useful when the sample consists of large, publicly-traded firms. We find little evidence that taxes matter for maturity decisions. Our findings also provide some evidence that borrower-lender relationships matter for debt maturity structures.

Suggested Citation

  • Cuneyt Orman & Bulent Koksal, 2015. "Structure Of Debt Maturity Across Firm Types," IPEK Working Papers 1504, Ipek University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ipk:wpaper:1504
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    File URL: http://econpapers.ipek.edu.tr/IpekWParchives/wp2015/wp1504OrmanKoksal.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Debt maturity structure; nonfinancial firms; Turkey;

    JEL classification:

    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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