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On the non-random distribution of educational deprivation of children in India

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  • Mothuri Venkatanarayana

    (Centre for Development Studies)

Abstract

The emphasis on education assumes importance given the recent recognition of human capital, human rights and human development perspectives of development. Hence educational deprivation is recognised as the primary agent of human deprivation and all necessary measuresare required to ensure minimum education for every child. Such auniversal recognition emanates from the given magnitude of educationally deprived children all around the world. On this premise,this is an attempt at examining the levels and inequities associated withthe phenomenon of educational deprivation of children during 1990's in India. This exercise provides a detailed exposition of the household characteristics of the deprived children based on information obtained in National Sample Survey Organisation (NSSO). The persistence of educational deprivation among children in India is due to socio-economic deprivation in general; however, it remains debatable but whether the remedy lies in making the schooling provision universal. This paper argues that the provision may be necessary but not a sufficient condition to accomplish the dream goal of universal elementary education. Alternatively it argues for a greater role of the state to ensure the enabling conditions in the household domain; in otherwords, the state has the responsibility of ensuring the well-being of all children on an equal footing. The state's responsibility is of equal importance of that of the parents.

Suggested Citation

  • Mothuri Venkatanarayana, 2005. "On the non-random distribution of educational deprivation of children in India," Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum Working Papers 372, Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum, India.
  • Handle: RePEc:ind:cdswpp:372
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Canagarajah, Sudharshan & Coulombe, Harold, 1997. "Child labor and schooling in Ghana," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1844, The World Bank.
    2. Sonia Bhalotra & Christopher Heady, 2003. "Child Farm Labor: The Wealth Paradox," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 197-227, December.
    3. Folbre, Nancy, 1994. "Children as Public Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 86-90, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Subramanian S & D. Jayaraj, 2010. "Out of School and (Probably) in Work: Child Labour and Capability Deprivation in India," Working Papers id:3261, eSocialSciences.
    2. Datta, Soumyendra Kishore & Singh, Krishna, 2016. "Analysis of child deprivation in India: Focus on health and educational perspectives," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 120-130.
    3. Chaganti, Ravi & Motkuri, Venkatanarayana, 2007. "Inclusive Growth and Employment, Poverty, and Inequality : With Reference to SC and STs in India," MPRA Paper 48505, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    India; Deprivation; Educationally Deprived Children; Child Labour; Educational Inequalities; Group Inequalities;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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