IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/imk/studie/58-2018.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Crisis management in Greece

Author

Listed:
  • Tassos Giannitsis
  • Stavros Zografakis

Abstract

The aim of this study is to explore the impact of the crisis and crisis-induced policies on incomes, inequality and poverty in Greece, to detect the types of adjustment and to show why prevailing perceptions and attitudes caused a heavy economic, social and political cost. Based on extensive income and tax data it investigates the changing relationship between labour, capital and pension income, changes in direct, indirect and property taxation, and their incidence on pre- and post-tax inequality and competitiveness between 2008 and 2012-13. It examines also the losers and the winners and the resulting social reclassifications within the Greek society, the multifaceted types of poverty and inequality and the changing relations between the haves and the haves-not. The analysis distinguishes property and income by main sources at the deciles level, and for the top 1% and 0.1% of the income distribution, at the household and individual level. It covers the period 2008-2015, depending on the available data. It is shown that many economic and social outcomes were the result of deficient approaches and ideological inflexibilities coupled to established political interests, making the exit from the crisis more complicated and painful. A first version of this study was published in March 2015 (Giannitsis and Zografakis 2015). The present edition comprises a deeper and more synthetic analysis and some completely new topics: privileged tax exemptions, structure and taxing of realestate, contribution of female employment on household's income, changes in employment patterns, evolution of the top incomes, effects of low-cost loans before the crisis and their impact on incomes and the banking sector after 2010.

Suggested Citation

  • Tassos Giannitsis & Stavros Zografakis, 2018. "Crisis management in Greece," IMK Studies 58-2018, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:imk:studie:58-2018
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.boeckler.de/pdf/p_imk_study_58_2018.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Louis Christofides & Maria Michael, 2013. "Exploring the public-private sector wage gap in European countries," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-53, December.
    2. Sanjeev Gupta, 1998. "Does Corruption Affect Income Inequality and Poverty?," IMF Working Papers 98/76, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Alberto Alesina & Dani Rodrik, 1994. "Distributive Politics and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 465-490.
    4. Alari Paulus & Holly Sutherland & Panos Tsakloglou, 2010. "The distributional impact of in-kind public benefits in European countries," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2), pages 243-266.
    5. Tsakloglou, Panos & Mitrakos, Theodore, 1998. "On the Distributional Impact of Excise Duties: Evidence from Greece," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 53(1), pages 78-101.
    6. Margit Molnár, 2012. "Fiscal consolidation: What factors determine the success of consolidation efforts?," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2012(1), pages 123-149.
    7. Maura Francese & Carlos Mulas-Granados, 2015. "Functional Income Distribution and Its Role in Explaining Inequality," IMF Working Papers 15/244, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Andreas BUEHN & Friedrich SCHNEIDER, 2016. "Size and Development of Tax Evasion in 38 OECD Coutries: What do we (not) know?," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 1-11, March.
    9. Thorbecke, Erik & Charumilind, Chutatong, 2002. "Economic Inequality and Its Socioeconomic Impact," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(9), pages 1477-1495, September.
    10. Georgia Kaplanoglou & Vassilis T. Rapanos & Ioanna C. Bardakas, 2015. "Does Fairness Matter for the Success of Fiscal Consolidation?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 197-219, May.
    11. Graham Pyatt & Chau-nan Chen & John Fei, 1980. "The Distribution of Income by Factor Components," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 95(3), pages 451-473.
    12. Alberto Alesina & Silvia Ardagna, 2010. "Large Changes in Fiscal Policy: Taxes versus Spending," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 24, pages 35-68 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. John Hills & Alari Paulus & Holly Sutherland & Iva Tasseva, 2014. "A lost decade? Decomposing the effect of 2001-11 tax-benefit policy changes on the income distribution in EU countries," ImPRovE Working Papers 14/03, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    14. Shorrocks, A F, 1982. "Inequality Decomposition by Factor Components," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 193-211, January.
    15. Anna Iara, 2015. "Wealth distribution and taxation in EU Members," Taxation Papers 60, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
    16. Pavlos Karanikolas & Stavros Zografakis, 2009. "Greek Farm Households: Income inequality, poverty and distributional impact of farm income," Working Papers 2009-08, Agricultural University of Athens, Department Of Agricultural Economics.
    17. Margit Molnar, 2012. "Fiscal Consolidation: Part 5. What Factors Determine the Success of Consolidation Efforts?," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 936, OECD Publishing.
    18. Mark A Horton & George C. Tsibouris & Wojciech Maliszewski & Mark J Flanagan, 2006. "Experience with Large Fiscal Adjustments," IMF Occasional Papers 246, International Monetary Fund.
    19. Theodore Mitrakos & Panos Tsakloglou & Ioannis Cholezas, 2010. "Determining factors of youth unemployment in Greece with emphasis on tertiary education graduates," Economic Bulletin, Bank of Greece, issue 33, pages 21-62, May.
    20. Kai Daniel Schmid & Ulrike Stein, 2013. "Explaining Rising Income Inequality in Germany, 1991-2010," IMK Studies 32-2013, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    21. Gustav A. Horn & Fabian Lindner & Torsten Niechoj & Achim Truger & Henner Will, 2011. "Voraussetzungen einer erfolgreichen Konsolidierung Griechenlands," IMK Report 66-2011, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    22. Benedict J. Clements & Sanjeev Gupta & Emanuele Baldacci & Carlos Mulas-Granados, 2004. "Front-Loaded or Back-Loaded Fiscal Adjustments; What Works in Emerging Market Economies?," IMF Working Papers 04/157, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:imk:studie:58-2018. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sabine Nemitz). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/imkhbde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.