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Reciprocity Networks and the Participation Problem

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  • Martin Dufwenberg
  • Amrish Patel

Abstract

Reciprocity can be a powerful motivation for human behaviour. Scholars argue that it is relevant in the context of private provision of public goods. We examine whether reciprocity can resolve the associated coordination problem. The interaction of reciprocity with cost-sharing is critical. Neither cost-sharing nor reciprocity in isolation can solve the problem, but together they have that potential. We introduce new network notions of reciprocity relations to better understand this. Our analysis uncovers an intricate web of nuances that demonstrate the attainable yet elusive nature of a unique outcome.Keywords: Discrete public good, participation, reciprocity networks, coordination, cost-sharing JEL codes: C72, D03, H41.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Dufwenberg & Amrish Patel, 2014. "Reciprocity Networks and the Participation Problem," Working Papers 521, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:igi:igierp:521
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    Cited by:

    1. Dominik Rothenhaüsler & Nikolaus Schweizer & Nora Szech, 2016. "Guilt in Voting and Public Good Games," Working Papers 2016-026, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Dooseok Jang & Amrish Patel & Martin Dufwenberg, 2016. "Co-financing agreements and reciprocity: When 'no deal' is a good deal," University of East Anglia School of Economics Working Paper Series 2016-12, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    3. repec:spr:inrvec:v:64:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12232-017-0270-y is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Rothenhäusler, Dominik & Schweizer, Nikolaus & Szech, Nora, 2016. "Guilt in voting and public good games," Working Paper Series in Economics 99, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Business Engineering.
    5. Andrea Martinangeli & Peter Martinsson & Amrish Patel, 2017. "Coordination via redistribution," University of East Anglia School of Economics Working Paper Series 2017-07, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    6. repec:eee:eecrev:v:101:y:2018:i:c:p:664-681 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Amrish Patel & Alec Smith, 2018. "Guilt and participation," University of East Anglia School of Economics Working Paper Series 2018-01, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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