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Pivotality and Responsibility Attribution in Sequential Voting

Author

Listed:
  • Björn Bartling

    () (Department of Economics, University of Zürich, Switzerland)

  • Urs Fischbacher

    () (Department of Economics, University of Konstanz, Germany, and TWI Kreuzlingen, Switzerland)

  • Simeon Schudy

    () (Department of Economics, University of Konstanz, Germany)

Abstract

Are people blamed for being pivotal if they implement an unpopular outcome in a sequential voting process? We conduct an experimental voting game and analyze how pivotality affects responsibility attribution by parties who can be negatively affected by the voting outcome. We measure responsibility attribution by assigned punishment points and find that pivotal decision makers are blamed significantly more than non-pivotal decision makers. Moreover, we find that some voters avoid being pivotal by voting strategically to delegate the pivotal vote to subsequent decision makers.

Suggested Citation

  • Björn Bartling & Urs Fischbacher & Simeon Schudy, 2014. "Pivotality and Responsibility Attribution in Sequential Voting," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2014-01, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  • Handle: RePEc:knz:dpteco:1401
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    File URL: http://www.uni-konstanz.de/FuF/wiwi/workingpaperseries/WP_01_Bartling-Fischbacher-Schudy_2014.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Falk, Armin & Szech, Nora, 2013. "Organizations, diffused pivotality and immoral outcomes," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2013-303, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
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    6. David K. Levine, 1998. "Modeling Altruism and Spitefulness in Experiment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(3), pages 593-622, July.
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    11. Lucas C. Coffman, 2011. "Intermediation Reduces Punishment (and Reward)," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 77-106, November.
    12. Tyran, Jean-Robert, 2004. "Voting when money and morals conflict: an experimental test of expressive voting," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1645-1664, July.
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    14. John R. Hamman & George Loewenstein & Roberto A. Weber, 2010. "Self-Interest through Delegation: An Additional Rationale for the Principal-Agent Relationship," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(4), pages 1826-1846, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Strobel, Christina & Kirchkamp, Oliver, 2017. "Sharing responsibility with a machine," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168106, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Bolle, Friedel & Spiller, Jörg, 2016. "Not efficient but payoff dominant: Experimental investigations of equilibrium play in binary threshold public good games," Discussion Papers 379, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Department of Business Administration and Economics.
    3. Grimm, Stefan & Klimm, Felix, 2018. "Blaming the Refugees? Experimental Evidence On Responsibility Attribution," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 83, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    4. Dufwenberg, Martin & Patel, Amrish, 2017. "Reciprocity networks and the participation problem," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 260-272.
    5. Bolle, Friedel, 2017. "A behavioral theory of equilibrium selection," Discussion Papers 392, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Department of Business Administration and Economics.
    6. Spiller, Jörg & Bolle, Friedel, 2017. "Experimental investigations of binary threshold public good games," Discussion Papers 393, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Department of Business Administration and Economics.
    7. Bolle, Friedel, 2017. "Passing the Buck On the acceptance of responsibility," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 86-101.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pivotality; voting; responsibility attribution; blame; delegation; experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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