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Sharing Guilt: How Better Access to Information May Backfire

Author

Listed:
  • Roman Inderst
  • Kiryl Khalmetski
  • Axel Ockenfels

Abstract

We provide laboratory evidence that the attribution of guilt for disappointed trust is shared between the players whose choices eventually contributed to this disappointment (including the disappointed player herself). We refer to this as "shared guilt" and present a model that captures the phenomenon, and which is consistent with various previous findings. We also discuss potential policy implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Roman Inderst & Kiryl Khalmetski & Axel Ockenfels, 2017. "Sharing Guilt: How Better Access to Information May Backfire," Working Paper Series in Economics 90, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kls:series:0090
    as

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    File URL: http://ockenfels.uni-koeln.de/fileadmin/wiso_fak/stawi-ockenfels/pdf/wp_series_download/wp0090.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Giuseppe Attanasi & Pierpaolo Battigalli & Elena Manzoni, 2016. "Incomplete-Information Models of Guilt Aversion in the Trust Game," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 62(3), pages 648-667, March.
    2. Santosh Anagol & Hugh Hoikwang Kim, 2012. "The Impact of Shrouded Fees: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in the Indian Mutual Funds Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 576-593, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Shared guilt; trust; guilt aversion; responsibility diffusion; financial advice;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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