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Co-financing agreements and reciprocity: When 'no deal' is a good deal

Author

Listed:
  • Dooseok Jang

    (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology)

  • Amrish Patel

    (University of East Anglia)

  • Martin Dufwenberg

    (University of Arizona)

Abstract

Institutions for co-financing agreements often exist to encourage public good investment. Can such frameworks deliver maximal investment when agents are motivated by reciprocity? We demonstrate that indeed they can, but not in the way one might expect. If maximal investment is impossible in the absence of the institution and public good returns are high, then an agreement signed by all parties cannot lead to full investment. However, if all parties reject the co-financing agreement, then an informal deal to invest can lead to full investment. Agreement institutions may thus do more than just facilitate the signing of formal agreements; they may play a critical role in igniting informal cooperation underpinned by reciprocity.

Suggested Citation

  • Dooseok Jang & Amrish Patel & Martin Dufwenberg, 2016. "Co-financing agreements and reciprocity: When 'no deal' is a good deal," University of East Anglia School of Economics Working Paper Series 2016-12, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
  • Handle: RePEc:uea:ueaeco:2016_12
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Falk, Armin & Fischbacher, Urs, 2006. "A theory of reciprocity," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 293-315, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    co-financing agreements; informal agreements; public goods; reciprocity;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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