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International Environmental Cooperation under Fairness and Reciprocity

Author

Listed:
  • Hadjiyiannis Costas

    (University of Cyprus)

  • İriş Doruk

    (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)

  • Tabakis Chrysostomos

    (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)

Abstract

This paper explores the implications of fairness and reciprocity for self-enforcing international environmental agreements on pollution abatement. Reciprocal countries reward fair behavior (positive reciprocity), but retaliate against countries behaving unfairly (negative reciprocity). We demonstrate that reciprocal countries that have moderate expectations from each other with respect to their national abatement strategies can support a greater degree of environmental cooperation than self-interested ones. However, when only very high abatement standards are deemed fair, then reciprocity could have a detrimental effect on international environmental cooperation. Our model therefore provides a novel perspective on the role of expectations in environmental negotiations.

Suggested Citation

  • Hadjiyiannis Costas & İriş Doruk & Tabakis Chrysostomos, 2012. "International Environmental Cooperation under Fairness and Reciprocity," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-30, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:12:y:2012:i:1:n:33
    DOI: 10.1515/1935-1682.2917
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Doruk Iris & Alessandro Tavoni, 2016. "Tipping Points and Loss Aversion in International Environmental Agreements," Working Papers 1603, Nam Duck-Woo Economic Research Institute, Sogang University (Former Research Institute for Market Economy).
    3. Jang, Dooseok & Patel, Amrish & Dufwenberg, Martin, 2018. "Agreements with reciprocity: Co-financing and MOUs," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 85-99.
    4. Doruk İriş, 2016. "Economic Targets And Loss-Aversion In International Environmental Cooperation," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(3), pages 624-648, July.
    5. Stefano Carattini & Simon Levin & Alessandro Tavoni, 2019. "Cooperation in the Climate Commons," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 13(2), pages 227-247.
    6. Jo, Ara & Carattini, Stefano, 2021. "Trust and CO2 emissions: Cooperation on a global scale," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 190(C), pages 922-937.
    7. Dooseok Jang & Amrish Patel & Martin Dufwenberg, 2016. "Co-financing agreements and reciprocity: When 'no deal' is a good deal," University of East Anglia School of Economics Working Paper Series 2016-12, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    8. Marco Vincenzi, 2023. "Mapping the empirical relationship between environmental performance and social preferences: Evidence from macro data," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2023(1), pages 85-102.
    9. Yu-Hsuan Lin, 2018. "How social preferences influence the stability of a climate coalition," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 0(2), pages 151-166.
    10. Nyborg, Karine, 2014. "Reciprocal Climate Negotiators: Balancing Anger against Even More Anger," Memorandum 17/2014, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    11. Doruk İriş & Sungwoo Im, & Hyeonggyun Ko, 2020. "Subjective Beliefs in International Agreements," Working Papers 2010, Nam Duck-Woo Economic Research Institute, Sogang University (Former Research Institute for Market Economy).
    12. Costas Hadjiyiannis & Doruk İriş & Chrysostomos Tabakis, 2012. "Multilateral tariff cooperation under fairness and reciprocity," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 45(3), pages 925-941, August.

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