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Homo reciprocans: survey evidence on behavioural outcomes

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  • Dohmen, T.J.

    (Research Centre for Educ and Labour Mark)

  • Falk, A.

    (Externe publicaties SBE)

  • Huffman, D.

    (Externe publicaties SBE)

  • Sunde, U.

    (Externe publicaties SBE)

Abstract

This article complements the experimental literature that has shown the importance of reciprocity for behaviour in stylised labour markets or other decision settings. We use individual measures of reciprocal inclinations in a large, representative survey and relate reciprocity to real world labour market behaviour and life outcomes. We find that reciprocity matters and that the way in which it matters is very much in line with the experimental evidence. In particular, positive reciprocity is associated with receiving higher wages and working harder. Negatively reciprocal inclinations tend to reduce effort. Negative reciprocity increases the likelihood of being unemployed.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Dohmen, T.J. & Falk, A. & Huffman, D. & Sunde, U., 2008. "Homo reciprocans: survey evidence on behavioural outcomes," ROA Research Memorandum 007, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2008007
    DOI: 10.26481/umaror.2008007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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