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Education and Its Distributional Impacts on Living Standards

  • Takahiro Ito

This paper investigates the determinants of living standards (measured by per capita consumption expenditure) at the household level, addressing heterogeneity in returns to education and endogeneity of educational status. The estimation results obtained through an instrumental variables quantile regression suggest that the endogeneity of education matters in determining the causal effect of education on living standards, while no evidence of the heterogeneity in the rate of returns to education is found. However, the results also provide evidence that impacts of other determinants vary significantly over the outcome (expenditure) distribution, and consequently a simulation based on the results shows that poverty alleviation impacts of education differs substantially between the instrumental variables quantile regression and standard instrumental variables regression results. The comparison of the two indicates the possibility that the impact on poverty reduction is likely to be overestimated in the standard instrumental variable regression.

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File URL: http://gcoe.ier.hit-u.ac.jp/research/discussion/2008/pdf/gd09-080.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series with number gd09-080.

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Date of creation: Aug 2009
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Handle: RePEc:hst:ghsdps:gd09-080
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  1. Omar Arias & Walter Sosa-Escudero & Kevin F. Hallock, 2001. "Individual heterogeneity in the returns to schooling: instrumental variables quantile regression using twins data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 7-40.
  2. Duraisamy, P., 2002. "Changes in returns to education in India, 1983-94: by gender, age-cohort and location," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 609-622, December.
  3. Datt, Gaurav & Jolliffe, Dean, 2005. "Poverty in Egypt: Modeling and Policy Simulations," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(2), pages 327-46, January.
  4. P. Duraisamy, 2000. "Changes in Returns to Education in India, 1983-94: By Gender, Age-Cohort and Location," Working Papers 815, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  5. Jolliffe, Dean, 2002. "Whose Education Matters in the Determination of Household Income? Evidence from a Developing Country," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(2), pages 287-312, January.
  6. Victor Chernozhukov & Christian Hansen, 2005. "An IV Model of Quantile Treatment Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(1), pages 245-261, 01.
  7. Yang, Dennis Tao, 1997. "Education and Off-Farm Work," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(3), pages 613-32, April.
  8. Takahiro Ito, 2007. "Caste Discrimination and Transaction Costs in the Labor Market: Evidence from Rural North India," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d06-200, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  9. Abhijit Banerjee & Lakshmi Iyer & Rohini Somanathan, 2005. "History, Social Divisions, and Public Goods in Rural India," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 639-647, 04/05.
  10. Behrman, Jere R & Knowles, James C, 1999. "Household Income and Child Schooling in Vietnam," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 211-56, May.
  11. Chernozhukov, Victor & Hansen, Christian, 2006. "Instrumental quantile regression inference for structural and treatment effect models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 132(2), pages 491-525, June.
  12. Geeta Gandhi Kingdon, 1998. "Does the labour market explain lower female schooling in India?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 39-65.
  13. Puja Vasudeva Dutta, 2006. "Returns to Education: New Evidence for India, 1983-1999," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 431-451.
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