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Poverty in Egypt: Modeling and Policy Simulations

Author

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  • Datt, Gaurav
  • Jolliffe, Dean

Abstract

Poverty profiles are a useful way of summarizing information on the levels of poverty and the characteristics of the poor in a society, but they are limited by the bivariate nature of their informational content. Using the 1997 Egypt Integrated Household Survey (EIHS), this article estimates models of household consumption in the first stage and then predicts poverty rates corresponding to changes in potential policy variables. The key results of the study point to the important instrumental role of education, parental background, land redistribution, and access to health facilities in alleviating poverty in Egypt.

Suggested Citation

  • Datt, Gaurav & Jolliffe, Dean, 2005. "Poverty in Egypt: Modeling and Policy Simulations," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(2), pages 327-346, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2005:v:53:i:2:p:327-46
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/425224
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    1. repec:pit:wpaper:313 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mussa, Richard, 2015. "A regression based model of average exit time from poverty with application to Malawi," MPRA Paper 65204, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Cassing, James & Nassar, Saad & Siam, Gamal & Moussa, Hoda, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Egypt," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48511, World Bank.
    4. Berk Özler, 2007. "Not Separate, Not Equal: Poverty and Inequality in Post-apartheid South Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55, pages 487-529.
    5. Kenneth R. Simler & Channing Arndt, 2007. "Poverty Comparisons With Absolute Poverty Lines Estimated From Survey Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 53(2), pages 275-294, June.
    6. Suleiman Abu-Bader & Daniel Gottlieb, 2009. "Poverty, education and employment in the Arab-Bedouin society: A comparative view," Working Papers 137, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    7. Takahiro Ito, 2009. "Education and Its Distributional Impacts on Living Standards," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd09-080, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    8. Schreinemachers, Pepijn & Berger, Thomas, 2006. "Simulating Farm Household Poverty: From Passive Victims to Adaptive Agents," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25479, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Mussa, Richard, 2015. "A joint analysis of correlates of poverty intensity, incidence, and gap with application to Malawi," MPRA Paper 65205, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. World Bank, 2003. "Timor-Leste Poverty Assessment : Poverty in a New Nation - Analysis for Action, Volume 2. Technical Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14817, The World Bank.
    11. Channing Arndt & Kristi Mahrt & Finn Tarp, 2016. "Absolute poverty lines," WIDER Working Paper Series 008, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Meng, Xin & Gregory, Robert & Wan, Guanghua, 2006. "China Urban Poverty and its Contributing Factors, 1986-2000," WIDER Working Paper Series 133, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. סלימאן אבו-בדר ודר' דניאל גוטליב, 2009. "עוני, חינוך ותעסוקה בחברה הערבית-בדואית: מבט השוואתי (באנגלית)," Working Papers 357, National Insurance Institute of Israel.
    14. World Bank, 2004. "Country Economic Memorandum : Realizing the Development Potential of Lao PDR, Volume 2. Main Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14492, The World Bank.
    15. Jean-Pierre Lachaud, 2007. "La dynamique de pauvreté provinciale et le marché du travail à Madagascar. Une analyse fondée sur une décomposition de régression," Documents de travail 136, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    16. Dasgupta, Utteeyo & Mani, Subha, 2015. "Only Mine or All Ours: Do Stronger Entitlements Affect Altruistic Choices in the Household," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 363-375.
    17. Boniface Ngah Epo & Francis Menjo Baye & Nadine Teme Angele Manga, 2011. "Spatial and Inter-temporal Sources of Poverty, Inequality and Gender Disparities in Cameroon: a Regression-Based Decomposition Analysis," Working Papers PMMA 2011-15, PEP-PMMA.
    18. Christophe MULLER & Sami BIBI, 2008. "Focused Transfer Targeting against Poverty Evidence from Tunisia," THEMA Working Papers 2008-37, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    19. Christophe Muller & Sami Bibi, 2010. "Refining Targeting against Poverty Evidence from Tunisia," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(3), pages 381-410, June.
    20. Jan, Dawood & Chishti, Anwar F. & Eberle, Phillip R., 2008. "An Analysis of Major Determinants of Poverty in Agriculture Sector in Pakistan," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6241, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    21. World Bank, 2003. "Timor-Leste Poverty Assessment : Poverty in a New Nation - Analysis for Action, Volume 1. Main Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14435, The World Bank.

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